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August 2014 Issue of Esquire Magazine To Feature New Stephen King Short Story, ‘That Bus Is Another World’

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The August 2014 edition of Esquire magazine will feature a new Stephen King short story entitled ‘That Bus Is Another World’ and the 3 page story is described as follows:

“What does it take to distract a man from being late for the interview of his life? Something evil.”

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Patton Oswalt: The Esquire Q&A

Patton Oswalt, the actor/comic talks about epic TV, The Return of the Jedi, the blessings of early failure, and a dirty animal joke.

Read the Esquire Q&A HERE.

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August 2012 Issue of Esquire Now Available – Contains Part 2 of “In The Tall Grass” by Stephen King & Joe Hill

Part 2 of “In the Tall Grass” by Stephen King and Joe Hill is now available on newstands in the August edition of Esquire.

The father and son collaboration will be available only in the print and iPad editions of the magazine.

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June/July Issue of Esquire To Feature New Fiction by Stephen King & Joe Hill

Esquire will publish a collaboration by Stephen King and his son Joe Hill as part of its launch of an e-book series called “Fiction for Men.”

The new story, “In the Tall Grass” will be published in two parts, the first to appear in the June/July issue and the conclusion in the August issue.

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Stephen King’s Novella Morality In The July 2009 Esquire Magazine

As I reported earlier this year, the new Stephen King novella entitled Morality is featured in the July 2009 issue of Esquire magazine.  The magazine should be on newsstands this week and features the Israeli model, Bar Refaeli on the cover with a temporary tattoo of the story covering her body. 

Here is a brief synopsis of the story: Chad, an aspiring writer who is teaching school until he lands a publishing contract, and his wife, Nora, who is working as a home nurse for a retired minister, are like most people these days struggling financially.  Nora is approached by her employer with a proposition that could make their dream of a home in Vermont a reality.  But will it be worth the moral consequences? 

July 2009 Esquire

 

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Stephen King Novella Will Appear In Summer Esquire Magazine

I spoke to Stephen King’s office yesterday about the upcoming novella entitled Morality.  According to Marsha DeFilippo, Mr. King’s assistant, the story will appear this summer in Esquire magazine possibly around July.  I’ll post more information when it becomes available.

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The 75th Anniversary Issue of Esquire Will Feature An E-Paper Cover

Esquire magazine is turning 75 and is celebrating the momentous event by releasing the first magazine ever with an electronic-ink-display cover. Only 100,000 copies of the high-tech October issue are heading to newstands, since the technology is still new and expensive.

The flashy cover, which uses the same technology as the Amazon Kindle e-book reader, is powered by a special battery that will keep the display on for at least 90 days. David Granger, the magazine’s editor-in-chief, told The New York Times that the magazine has been playing with the idea of using electronic paper since 2000 until it finally became possible and hired an engineer in China to develop a battery small enough to be inserted in the magazine cover.

In a nod to the digital age, Esquire’s cover will flash the words “the 21st Century Begins Now,” and the issue will be dedicated to “exploring the ideas, people and issues that will be the foundation of the 21st century” according to Granger.

This little stunt will cost the magazine a pretty penny, which is why Ford will co-sponsor the issue by running a double-page e-ink advertisement on the back of the magazine featuring the new Ford Flex crossover vehicle.

Expect the magazine to hit newstands in mid-September and eBay shortly thereafter. Can’t wait to see the bidding war on this one.  (Reprinted from Yahoo Buzz)

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Adam West, Star of TV’s Batman, Dies at 88

Adam West, who donned a cape, cowl and tights to became an overnight sensation in 1966 as the star of the campy “Batman” TV series, has died, according to a family statement. He was 88.

West, who later lamented being typecast as the iconic Caped Crusader but eventually embraced having been part of American pop culture, died Friday in Los Angeles after a short battle with leukemia, according to multiple reports.

A former Warner Bros. contract player, West was appearing in TV commercials in the mid-1960s to help pay the rent. But several commercials he did for Nestle’s Quik chocolate powder — parodies of the popular James Bond movies in which West played a dry-witted character called Captain Q — had an unexpected outcome.

They caught the attention of 20th Century Fox TV producer William Dozier, who was looking for someone to star as Gotham City millionaire Bruce Wayne and his crime-fighting alter-ego, Batman, in a farcical new series for ABC.

Based on the DC character created by artist Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger in 1939, “Batman” debuted in January 1966 as a twice-weekly half-hour program — 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays, with the Wednesday episode ending on a cliffhanger.

West knew his life would never be the same the night the heavily promoted first episode aired.

“I stopped at the market on the way home,” he told Esquire magazine in 2004. “I thought, ‘Tonight, I just want to be alone. I’ll stop, get a steak and a six pack, whatever, then go home and watch the debut of the show.’

“As I walked through the checkout line, I heard people saying, ‘C’mon, c’mon, hurry up. “Batman” is coming on!’ And I said to myself, ‘Goodbye, anonymity.’ ”

The tongue-in-cheek series roared into public consciousness like the Batmobile out of the Batcave.

With West as the strait-laced crime fighter who spoke with what has been described as ironic earnestness and Burt Ward as his youthfully exuberant sidekick, Robin, “Batman” was a pop culture phenomenon in a decade that was full of them.

“This whole thing is an insane, mad fantasy world,” West said of the show in a Chicago Daily News interview shortly before its debut. “And my goal is to become American’s biggest put-on.”

It was high camp indeed, with fight scenes punctuated by comic book-style “POW!” “BOP!” and “WHAP!” exclamations flashing on the screen and an array of guest-star villains that included Frank Gorshin as the Riddler, Burgess Meredith as the Penguin, Cesar Romero as the Joker and Julie Newmar and Eartha Kitt as Catwoman.

West quickly learned the key to slipping into the Batman persona.

“You pull on the mask and the utility belt and the gloves, and you must believe the moment that’s done that you really are Batman,” West said in a late 1980s interview on TV’s “Entertainment Tonight.”

“What I loved about Batman was his total lack of awareness when it came to his interaction with the outside world,” West told London’s Independent newspaper in 2005. “He actually believed nobody could recognize him on the phone, when he was being Bruce Wayne, even though he made no attempt to disguise his voice.”

In the first episode of the series, he recalled, “Batman goes into a nightclub in the cowl, cape and bat gloves. When the maitre d’ says: ‘Ringside table, Batman?’ he replies, ‘No thank you. I’ll stand at the bar. I would not wish to be conspicuous.’ ”

In June 1966, The Times reported that “Batman” had been a “life-transforming” success for West: Fan mail was arriving “by the wagonsful” — as were requests for everything from personal appearances to locks of his hair.

But West, The Times said, had “no panic about becoming solely and totally identified with the caped role.”

“I love doing the show, and frankly it’s given me more identification than any three movies could have,” West told The Times. “What I’ve got to feel is that if I can make a success of this characterization, I can make a success of other characterizations.”

The “Batman” series spawned a 1966 movie version and an array of merchandise, including lunchboxes, dolls and toy Batmobiles.

Both nights of “Batman” were rated in the top-10 list of shows for the 1965-66 season. But as with any fad, the show’s popularity eventually began to fade.

By the fall of 1967, the series was cut back to once a week, and it was canceled in March 1968.

Before his overnight stardom as Batman, West had made guest appearances on TV series such as “Cheyenne,” “Maverick” and “77 Sunset Strip” and had been a regular for a season on Robert Taylor’s series “The Detectives.”

He also had roles in movies such as “Tammy and the Doctor” (1963), “Robinson Crusoe on Mars” (1964) and “The Outlaws Is Coming!” (1965, opposite the Three Stooges).

But after “Batman” ended, West told Scripps Howard News Service in 2001, “It was a bleak time in my career because of typecasting in ‘Batman.’ I couldn’t get away from it.”

As he told the Orange County Register in 1989: “I was almost to the finish line for a lot of big, leading-man type roles that I really wanted, but I’d always come in second or third. Somebody in charge would always say, ‘Hey, what are you guys doing? You can’t put Batman in bed with Faye Dunaway.”

West went on to do guest shots on “Fantasy Island” and “Laverne & Shirley” and other TV shows. He also appeared in movies such as “The Marriage of a Young Stockbroker” (1971), “Hooper” (1978) and “The Happy Hooker Goes Hollywood” (1980).

In 1986, he starred as the police captain in the 1986 NBC sitcom “The Last Precinct,” but the series was quickly canceled. He also voiced a few TV cartoon versions of “Batman” over the years and more recently provided the voice for Mayor Adam West in the animated comedy TV series “Family Guy.”

In time, West came to appreciate having played Batman.

“The reaction has been so positive and good for me that I love it now,” he told The Times in 2009. “How could I not? I would hate to be a bitter, aging actor. I’ve been so fortunate to have this opportunity to bring Batman alive on the screen.”

As for the newer, darker depictions of Gotham City on the big screen, West said they “are grim, Gothic, full of explosions, mayhem. It’s the way of things, I suppose; the whole world seems darker.”

But, he said, “I look at [it] this way: They’ve got ‘The Dark Knight,’ and I was the bright knight. Or maybe I was even … the neon knight.”

West is survived by his wife, Marcelle, six children, five grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

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Michael Chabon’s New Novel, Moonglow To Arrive On November 22, 2016

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Following on the heels of his New York Times bestselling novel Telegraph Avenue, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Michael Chabon delivers another literary masterpiece: a novel of truth and lies, family legends, and existential adventure—and the forces that work to destroy us

In 1989, fresh from the publication of his first novel, The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Michael Chabon traveled to his mother’s home in Oakland, California to visit his terminally ill grandfather. Tongue loosened by powerful painkillers, memory stirred by the imminence of death, Chabon’s grandfather shared recollections and told stories the younger man had never heard before, uncovering bits and pieces of a history long buried and forgotten. That dreamlike week of revelations forms the basis for the novel Moonglow, the latest feat of legerdemain in the ongoing magic act that is the art of Michael Chabon.

Moonglow unfolds as the deathbed confession, made to his grandson, of a man the narrator refers to only as “my grandfather.” It is a tale of madness, of war and adventure, of sex and desire and ordinary love, of existential doubt and model rocketry, of the shining aspirations and demonic underpinnings of American technological accomplishment at mid-century and, above all, of the destructive impact—and the creative power—of the keeping of secrets and the telling of lies. A gripping, poignant, tragicomic, scrupulously researched and wholly imaginary transcript of a life that spanned the dark heart of the twentieth century, Moonglow is also a tour de force of speculative history in which Chabon attempts to reconstruct the mysterious origins and fate of Chabon Scientific, Co., an authentic mail-order novelty company whose ads for scale models of human skeletons, combustion engines and space rockets were once a fixture in the back pages of Esquire, Popular Mechanics, and Boy’s Life. Along the way Chabon devises and reveals, in bits and pieces whose hallucinatory intensity is matched only by their comic vigor and the radiant moonglow of his prose, a secret history of his own imagination.

From the Jewish slums of prewar South Philadelphia to the invasion of Germany, from a Florida retirement village to the penal utopia of New York’s Wallkill Prison, from the heyday of the space program to the twilight of “the American Century,” Moonglow collapses an era into a single life and a lifetime into a single week. A lie that tells the truth, a work of fictional non-fiction, an autobiography wrapped in a novel disguised as a memoir, Moonglow is Chabon at his most daring, his most moving, his most Chabonesque.

Moonglow will be available on November 22, 2016.

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KaPow Posters To Release Hellboy: War On Hell Poster By Jeremy Wheeler On Friday

KaPow Posters is excited to announce that this Friday they will be premiering a brand new poster by Jeremy Wheeler. Jeremy is a poster artist based in the Midwest. This year he has gained attention for several of his horror prints, including a blacklight Suspiria poster, a Freddy Krueger VHS tribute piece, and his John Carpenter charity print for Death Waltz Recording Co. Additionally, his work has been seen in several magazines, including Esquire. 

This piece titled “War on Hell” pays homage to the world of Hellboy and the artist has perfectly captured the Lovecraftian world that exists inside the Hellboy comics.

The prints will go on sale on Friday December 27, 2013 at 10:30am CST and you can order them HERE.

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War on Hell by Jeremy Wheeler. Hand numbered edition of 150. 9″x24″ 5-colors on 100lb French Paper. Printed by VG kids. $30

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War on Hell by Jeremy Wheeler. Hand numbered edition of 150. 9″x24″ 2-colors with Glow Ink on 100lb French Paper. Printed by VGKids. $30

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