Category Archives: Magazine

The 100 Greatest Designs of Modern Times

What does it take to become a design icon? There‘s more to it than good looks. These 100 products have made our lives simpler, better, and yes, more stylish.

Check out the list from Fortune Magazine HERE.

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What Are The 50 Best Science Fiction TV Shows of All Time?

It’s odd to think that, once upon a time, a TV show set in space — one that declared, in its opening narration, as the cosmos being the “final frontier” — was considered the pop-cultural equivalent of an unwanted party-crasher. Yes, a concept like Star Trek was both of its time and clearly ahead of it; history has more than vindicated Gene Rodenberry’s notion of boldly going where no man had gone before. But given the number of top-notch shows set in the far reaches of the galaxy and that used genre for pulpy and profound purposes over the last 30 or so years, it seems crazy to think that one of the most groundbreaking SF series was a network pariah and a ratings dud. Today, there’s an entire cable network devoted to this kind of programming. You can’t turn on your TV/Roku/cut-cord viewing device without bumping into spaceships, alien invasion and wonky sci-fi food-for-thought.

Science fiction has been around in one form or another since the early-ish days of television, both here and abroad, and its legacy now looms larger than ever. 

So what better time to count down the 50 best sci-fi TV shows of all time? From anime classics to outer-space soap operas, spooky British anthology shows to worst-case-scenario postapocalyptic dramas, primetime pop hits to obscure but beloved cult classics, HERE are Rolling Stone’s choices for the best the television genre has to offer — submitted, for your approval.

My personal favorites include: The Six-Million Dollar Man, Lost, Stranger Things, Watchmen, Westworld, The Mandalorian, The Twilight Zone, and Star Trek.

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Entertainment Weekly Black Widow Cover Story

Scarlett Johansson readies for battle the way a veteran doctor scrubs in for surgery or an astronaut gears up for her eighth space flight. Hair drawn back in a tidy braid, she barely glances down at Natasha Romanoff’s familiar black catsuit as she buckles every buckle and zips every zipper with rhythmic efficiency. Squeezed into a closet-size armory on a Manhattan Beach soundstage, Johansson’s assassin-turned-Avenger is surrounded by all the guns, knives, and glossy wigs a superspy could ever need. She moves like she’s been doing this for a decade — because she has.

But this is something new: There’s no Captain America or Hawkeye to assist her, no S.H.I.E.L.D. backup waiting out of sight. This is Black Widow’s long-awaited solo movie, set in the turmoil between the all-star superhero team’s breakup in 2016’s Captain America: Civil War and their reunion in 2018’s Avengers: Infinity War. The mission she’s prepping for is personal, as the former Russian agent is going up against opponents from her past. When a fellow Widow, Rachel Weisz’s Melina, wonders how they’ll tackle one particularly formidable foe, Natasha replies, “Just get me close to him.” It’s not an arrogant quip or a self-congratulatory boast, just a matter-of-fact threat from a spy who is very, very good at her job.

Then, just as Johansson pulls on her last glove with a satisfying snap…darkness. The studio has lost power; in the dark, someone calls out for flashlights. After a quick investigation, the production crew discovers the blackout is not the work of a diabolical supervillain but a blown transformer nearby. Natasha’s mission will have to wait a little while longer — but that’s all right. Black Widow knows how to wait.

Read more HERE.

To read more on Black Widow, pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly beginning on Tuesday, March 17.

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TIME Reveals 100 Women of The Year: The Leaders, Innovators, Activists, Entertainers, Athletes And Artists Who Defined A Century

Inspired by TIME’s annual Person of the Year, which started in 1927 as “Man of the Year” and became “Person of the Year” in 1999, and timed to International Women’s Day and the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the U.S., this historic TIME project recognizes the most influential women of each year from 1920-2019.

TIME executive editor and editorial director of 100 Women of the Year Kelly Conniff writes: “For me, seeing women on the cover of a magazine created by men for ‘busy men,’ as TIME’s founders wrote in their original prospectus, is always powerful. I joined TIME in 2012, when over the course of a year just a handful of women were featured on the cover. In 2019, TIME featured more solo women on its cover than men for the first time in our 97-year history. The world has changed and TIME has too, but there have always been women worthy of TIME’s cover.”

Go behind the scenes of this important issue HERE.

Conceived with award-winning filmmaker Alma Har’el, the 100 Women of the Year were selected by TIME editors, in collaboration with Har’el, and a committee of influential women across different fields, including Katie Couric, Soledad O’Brien, Lena Waithe, MJ Rodriguez, Elaine Welteroth, Amanda Nguyen, Zazie Beetz, and former editor in chief of TIME Nancy Gibbs.

“Each generation inherits a history, focused through the lens of those who came before it—but time tends to reveal a greater depth of field. We need to reclaim our narrative and salute the women who changed our world but were not given the place in history they deserved.  I’m honored and thankful to TIME for opening their Person of the Year process for the first time ever and making Women of the Year a reality,” said Har’el.  

For the first time in its history, TIME releases 100 TIME covers for a single project. Each of the 100 Women of the Year is recognized with a TIME cover that is visually emblematic of the period its subject represents. In all, TIME commissioned 49 original artists’ portraits, including work by Koyin Ojih Odutola, Mickalene Thomas, Shana Wilson, Bisa Butler, Yulia Brodskaya, Amaya Gurpide, Jennifer Dionisio, Mercedes deBellard, Lavett Ballard and more.

See all of the covers HERE.

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Here’s How To Make Kevin’s Famous Chili From The Office 

In celebration of National Chili Day and The Office’s upcoming 15th anniversary, Entertainment Weekly looks back at the time Dunder Mifflin’s bumbling accountant Kevin Malone (Brian Baumgartner) lugged in a huge pot of his famous chili to share with his co-workers — and spilled it all over the floor.

“At least once a year, I like to bring in some of my Kevin’s Famous Chili,” he says in the season 5 episode “Casual Friday” (watch a clip below). “The trick is to undercook the onions. Everybody is going to get to know each other in the pot. I’m serious about this stuff. I’m up the night before, pressing garlic and dicing whole tomatoes. I toast my own ancho chilies. It’s a recipe passed down from Malones for generations — it’s probably the thing I do best.”

When The Office shot this classic cold open, they just used Hormel chili from a can. EW took it one step further and faithfully recreated Kevin’s family dish. (Recipe developed by Adam Hickman.)

Kevin’s Famous Chili Recipe

4 dried ancho chiles (about 1 3/4 oz.)
2 Tbsp. canola oil
3 lbs. 85/15 lean ground beef
2 cups coarsely chopped yellow onion (from 1 [12-oz.] onion)
1/4 cup coarsely chopped jalapeño chile (from 1 [2-oz.] chile)
8 large garlic cloves
1 Tbsp. dried oregano
2 (12-oz.) bottles lager beer
3 (15-oz.) cans kidney beans, drained and rinsed
1 to 2 Tbsp. water
3 cups beef stock
2 1/2 cups finely chopped plum tomatoes (from 3 large tomatoes)
2 Tbsp. kosher salt
4 oz. cheddar cheese, shredded (about 1 cup)
1/2 cup sour cream
1/4 cup sliced scallions (from 2 scallions)

1. Tear ancho chiles into large pieces, discarding seeds and stems. Place ancho chiles in a Dutch oven. Cook over medium high, stirring occasionally, until very fragrant, 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer ancho chiles to a food processor; process until very finely ground, about 1 minute. Remove, and set aside.

2. Add oil to Dutch oven, and heat over medium high. Add half of the ground beef; cook, stirring occasionally to break beef into small pieces, until well browned, about 6 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer beef from Dutch oven to a plate, and set aside. Repeat with remaining beef.

3. Pulse onion in a food processor until finely chopped, about 5 pulses. Remove from food processor, and set aside. Add onion to Dutch oven, and cook over medium high, stirring occasionally, 2 minutes. (Onion will be undercooked.) Remove from heat.

4. Process jalapeño in a food processor until finely chopped, about 30 seconds. Finely grate garlic using a Microplane grater (or press with a garlic press). Add ground ancho chiles, finely chopped jalapeño, grated garlic and oregano to Dutch oven; cook over medium high, stirring occasionally, until jalapeño starts to soften, about 2 minutes. Add beer; cook 7 minutes, stirring and scraping occasionally to loosen any browned bits from bottom of Dutch oven.

5. Meanwhile, place beans and 1 tablespoon of the water in food processor, and process until smooth, about 1 minute. (If necessary, add remaining 1 tablespoon water, and process until smooth.)

6. Add pureed beans, stock, tomatoes, salt, and cooked beef to Dutch oven. Cover and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to medium low to maintain simmer, and cook 2 hours so everything gets to know each other in the pot. Remove from heat; uncover and let stand 1 hour. Cover and refrigerate 8 hours or up to overnight.

7. Reheat, and bring chili to a simmer over medium high, stirring often. Serve with cheese, sour cream, and scallions.

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Phil LaMarr Improvises Voices

Cartoon fans will recognize Phil LaMarr as the man behind the voices of Samurai Jack, Hermes Conrad on Futurama, and hundreds of other characters. Vanity Fair asked Phil to improvise 12 new character voices entirely based on their illustrations. If there’s one thing the clip proves is just how impressive his range and imagination is.

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Celebrate The 15th Anniversary of The Office With Entertainment Weekly’s Special Collector’s Edition

Take a break from planning the next way you’re going to mercilessly prank your co-workers and listen up! Whether you’ve been a fan of The Office since it first premiered on March 24, 2005, or you’ve more recently become acquainted with the Dunder Mifflin crew after having binged one, two, or — let’s be honest — all nine seasons on Netflix, Entertainment Weekly has good news for you.

In celebration of the beloved workplace comedy’s 15th anniversary, EW pulled together a special collector’s edition chock full of Office trivia and exclusive interviews with the cast and creators. Inside you’ll find oral histories recounting Jim and Pam’s nuptials, Michael Scott’s last day, and the show’s teary finale.

Entertainment Weekly’s Ultimate Guide to The Office also revisits some of the most hilarious and cringe-worthy episodes (“Dinner Party,” anyone?) and tests your knowledge on how well you really know Scranton’s very own beet connoisseur Dwight Schrute. Dunderheads are sure to get a kick out of a serious film review of Michael’s Threat Level Midnight, a crossword puzzle dedicated to Stanley, a field guide to Angela’s cats, and much more. There’s even a recipe for Kevin’s famous chili recipe. (Tip: Undercook the onions.)

Pick up a copy of Entertainment Weekly’s Ultimate Guide to The Office, available now wherever magazines are sold 

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A New Stephen King Short Story, “The Fifth Step” To Appear In March 2020 Harper’s Magazine

A new Stephen King short story titled “The Fifth Step” appears in the March 2020 issue of Harper’s Magazine. Read the story HERE.

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Wonder Woman 1984: How A Top-Secret Love Story And Brand New Armor Promise To Make The Sequel Sing

Gal Gadot is waiting for the boosh. Eyes narrowed, bouncing lightly on her toes — float like a butterfly, sting like an Amazonian queen — she moves soundlessly through the chilled air of cavernous studio outside London, her shoulder blades blooming into a set of molten-gold wings.

When the explosion comes, it’s muffled, but the soldiers who emerge from the blast in full combat gear don’t look like they’re here to make friends. As she dispatches them one by one, it’s impossible not to imagine how many of them are experiencing the highlight of their working lives in this very moment: men who will spend the next 40 years telling every first date and airplane seatmate about that one time they were annihilated by the warrior princess of Themyscira.

“Ahhh, so uncomfortable!” Gadot says with a good-naturedly grimace after the scene finally wraps, shrugging off her shiny albatross and slipping into the plush gray robe and Ugg boots that wait for her just off stage. It’s the closest the 34-year-old onetime Miss Israel will come to uttering an uncheerful word, even after long hours spent in a wingspan that defies the natural laws of both orthopedics and most actual birds.

Endurance, though, is built into the brand: A months-long shoot has already hopscotched from the sunbaked Spanish cliffs of Tenerife to suburban Virginia and now back to the bone-chilling damp of England in early winter. On the set of 2017’s Wonder Woman, Gadot remembers, she and costar Chris Pine would sing Foreigner’s “Cold as Ice” to each other between takes to stay warm; in the follow-up, due June 5, the action moves from the grim grayscale battlefields of WWI to the neon era that birthed many a hair band — and the movie’s titular star, too. 

“I was born in ’85, but it’s funny, I really do remember,” Gadot says in her lightly accented English, settling into a canvas-back chair steps from where she just brought a battalion to its knees. “Probably more so because of my parents, but it was a such a standout decade as much as it goes with fashion, music, politics. And the look of everything! The colors.”

If you had to pick just one from the palette, you might want to start with green: the color of money, of course, but envy, too. “In 1984, America was at the peak of its power and its pride,” says associate producer Anna Obropta. “Apple computers and parachute pants, wealth, commercialism, glamour, even violence — everything was larger than life. It was a decade of greed and desire, a time of ‘Me, me, more more more.’”

Read more of the Entertainment Weekly cover story HERE and pick up the issue on Friday, February 14.

     

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Daniel Craig Faces Off With Supervillain Rami Malek In No Time To Die, His Final James Bond Film

In his last mission as James Bond 007, Daniel Craig squares off against Rami Malek. 

For Entertainment Weekly’s February cover, the ‘No Time to Die’ star reflects on the iconic role and why he signed on for his final Bond film.

Read more HERE.

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