Category Archives: Magazine

Entertainment Weekly Assembles 15 Avengers: Infinity War Covers

For this week’s Entertainment Weekly double issue, the magazine is devoted to covering Marvel’s Avengers: Infinity War and they present 15 distinct covers featuring 22 heroes and one Mad Titan.

Pick up the new issue on stands Friday. Check out all of the covers below!

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MAD Magazine Will Reboot In April

MAD Magazine will be rebooted with a new #1 and a new look when it moves to California later this year, DC co-publisher Dan DiDio revealed on his Facebook page.

MAD Magazine #550, on sale now, will mark the final issue of the current volume of the magazine, which launched at EC Comics in 1952 before being taken over by DC after EC crumbled in the mid-‘50s.

A new #1 will launch in April, likely timed as close to April Fools’ Day as possible. April 1 has long been recognized as the symbolic birthday of MAD mascot Alfred E. Neuman, whose gap-toothed visage has graced the cover of the magazine for decades. A version with his teeth and hair “fixed” appears on a promotional image for the new MAD #1, which will be edited by longtime Bongo Comics veteran Bill Morrison.

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Fangoria Magazine Is Resurrected From The Dead

Cinestate, a Texas-based entertainment company, completed the deal to acquire all the assets and trademarks of the Fangoria brand, including the horror movie magazine, from The Brooklyn Company. Fangoria Magazine will move from digital-only back to print and a new editor-in-chief with Phil Nobile, and a new publisher with a new first issue readying to drop on Halloween.

Nobile comes to Fangoria from his role as editor-at-large for the website Birth.Movies.Death. He will be based out of New Jersey and act as the creative director for the entire Fangoria brand. Cinestate CEO Dallas Sonnier, who had pursued the deal for months, is the new publisher. As part of the arrangement, Cinestate controls all material from over 300 issues of Fangoria Magazine, which means all articles, photos, and exclusive interviews, spanning the past 39 years.

Cinestate says it will further develop Fangoria into a brand for producing movies and podcasts, as well as publishing horror novels.

Fangoria’s previous columnists Tony Timpone and Michael Gingold are returning to the magazine with their own columns, and to consult for the company. Zack Parker, formerly of Shudder, joins Fangoria as the director of brand management, along with Jessica Safavimehr as Associate Publisher and Ashley Detmering as Art Director for the magazine.

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Solo: A Star Wars Story: This Week’s Entertainment Weekly Cover Story

Han Solo just can’t help being a good guy — much to his disappointment.

Try as he might to live outside the law, to care about nothing, to embody his loner name, he finds himself inexorably pushed and pulled by the tractor beam of his own decency. Just when you think he’s gone forever, he comes back to save the day.

That’s now literally true. Fans saw his journey end in The Force Awakens, but with the stand-alone Solo: A Star Wars Story (out May 25) Han is returning to the fight.

In this week’s issue, Entertainment Weekly expands about the glimpse we got in the two new teasers with revelations about the story and criminal characters that will surround the galactic smuggler.

Alden Ehrenreich is stepping into the cockpit for Harrison Ford, and the story rewinds the chronology to several years before the events of 1977’s original Star Wars. The filmmakers describe it as a Western crossed with a film noir, freighted with offbeat humor and set in the criminal underbelly of a galaxy being torn apart.

The Han movie is very Han about its arrival. It’s swooping in at the last minute with a first trailer and detailed revelations just a few months before release, and it all comes amid intense internal drama and second-guessing.

Original filmmakers Phil Lord and Chris Miller (The LEGO Movie, 21 Jump Street) parted ways with Lucasfilm over creative clashes that led to obvious upheaval in the midst of production. Oscar-winner Ron Howard, who has followed Star Wars ever since George Lucas first described his plan for it on the set of 1973’s American Graffiti, jumped in to pilot the movie home.

With luck and some skill — which Han always counted on in equal measure — this bumpy flight will smooth out in the end.

Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy describes Solo as “a heist, gunslinger type movie.” That roller coaster-like train in the trailer is called The Conveyex, and Han has to prove his hoodlum bona fides by stealing something (we don’t know what) from on board.

“He might be a little more immature, he may be a little less experienced, and he may hone his cynicism over time, but he’s very wary,” she says. “He needs to gain the respect of the people he interacts with, even if they’re the lowest of the low.”

Along the way he will befriend “walking carpet” Chewbacca (Joonas Suotamo), fall head over heels for shadowy Qui’ra (Game of Thrones’ Emilia Clarke), and cross paths with Lando Calrissian (Atlanta’s Donald Glover stepping into the cape of Billy Dee Williams) and his droid sidekick L3-37 (played via motion capture by Fleabag star Phoebe Waller-Bridge.)

The wannabe smuggler will also face career crooks Tobias Beckett (Woody Harrelson), blaster-toting Val (Thandie Newton), and crime boss Dryden Vos (played by Paul Bettany).

If you’re trying to figure out who’s good and who’s bad, you’re not alone. “I think that’s exactly what Han’s trying to do throughout the film,” Ehrenreich says.

To read more on Solo: A Star Wars Story, pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly on stands Friday.

Reprinted from Entertainment Weekly

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Check Out The First X-Men: Dark Phoenix Photos

Entertainment Weekly has released the cover of their next issue which features the very first look at the upcoming X-Men: Dark Phoenix! Check it out along with the first photos from the upcoming X-Men film.

The magazine also has some story details for the sequel, confirming that it takes place ten years after X-Men: Apocalypse and is set during 1992. The film will open with the X-Men in unfamiliar territory: national heroes. In fact, Charles Xavier lands on the cover of TIME magazine, and with his newfound inflated ego he starts sending the team on more dangerous missions.

“Pride is starting to get the better of him, and he is pushing the X-Men to more extreme missions,” director Simon Kinberg says.

The result is the team’s first trip into space where a mission gone awry awakens none other than, you guessed it, The Phoenix Force within Sophie Turner’s Jean Grey.

“This is probably the most emotional X-Men we’ve done and the most pathos-driven,” star James McAvoy says. “There’s a lot of sacrifice and a lot of suffering.”

EW also reveals new details on Jessica Chastain’s villain role in the film (previously said to be Lilandra. Empress of the Shi’ar empire) calling her as “otherwordly shapeshifter who manipulates Phoenix for her own agenda” and saying she’s “quiet but brutal.”

X-Men: Dark Phoenix will bring back much of the cast of the new films, including James McAvoy (Professor X), Michael Fassbender (Magneto), Jennifer Lawrence (Mystique), Nicholas Hoult (Beast), Alexandra Shipp (Storm), Tye Sheridan (Cyclops), Kodi Smit-McPhee (Nightcrawler). Sophie Turner (Jean Grey), and Evan Peters (Quicksilver). Lamar Johnson of The Next Step has joined the cast in a mystery role and the mutant Dazzler will reportedly play a part in the film.

Simon Kinberg is writing and directing the film, marking his directorial debut. He will also produce alongside Lauren Shuler Donner and Hutch Parker. X-Men: Dark Phoenix is set to open in theaters on November 2, 2018.

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Star Wars: The Last Jedi Rolling Stone Cover Story 

Rolling Stone’s latest issue reveals untold secrets of the next chapter in the Luke Skywalker saga, including some facts fans probably didn’t see coming.

As director Rian Johnson put it, “I shook the box up a little bit.”

The cast and director of Star Wars: The Last Jedi discuss the story’s secrets, a disaffected Skywalker and a death in the family. Read more HERE.

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Avengers: Infinity War Gets 4 Vanity Fair Covers

The stars of the Marvel Cinematic Universe recently all got together for a 10th-Anniversary photo shoot and Vanity Fair was there to talk to them, Marvel’s Kevin Feige, and Disney chairman and CEO Bob Iger about the past and the future of the franchise.

The magazine reiterates that Avengers 4 will see some of the characters hanging up their capes and shields, partially because the contracts with the actors who play them — Chris Evans (Captain America), Mark Ruffalo (Hulk), Robert Downey Jr. (Iron Man), Scarlett Johansson (Black Widow), Chris Hemsworth (Thor), and Jeremy Renner (Hawkeye) — are coming to an end. But Disney promises that Marvel has at least another 20 years’ worth of characters and worlds to explore.

“I feel a lot of joy for the next generation,” Johansson said. “It’s a bittersweet feeling, but a positive one.”

Bob Iger notes that the studio has rights to 7,000 characters. “We’re looking for worlds that are completely separate — geographically or in time — from the worlds that we’ve already visited.”

Marvel is “22 movies in, and we’ve got another 20 movies on the docket that are completely different from anything that’s come before – intentionally,” Feige added. Avengers 4, he said, will “bring things you’ve never seen in superhero films: a finale. There will be two distinct periods. Everything before Avengers 4 and everything after. I know it will not be in ways people are expecting.”

Confirmed cast members for Avengers: Infinity War so far include Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Scalett Johansson, Chris Hemsworth, Anthony Mackie, Paul Bettany, Elizabeth Olson, Jeremy Renner, Chadwick Boseman, Sebastian Stan, Don Cheadle, Chris Pratt, Dave Bautista, Zoe Saldana, Pom Klementieff, Benedict Cumberbatch, Benedict Wong, Sean Gunn, Tom Holland, Josh Brolin, and Paul Rudd.

The Avengers sequel sees Earth’s Mightiest Heroes teaming up with the Guardians of the Galaxy to take on Brolin’s Thanos and his Black Order.

Directors Anthony and Joe Russo, who return after Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Captain America: Civil War, are directing both Avengers: Infinity War and the untitled fourth film, which are written by screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely. Marvel’s Avengers: Infinity War is slated for a release in theaters on May 4, 2018. Then, the Avengers assemble again for the still-untitled fourth film, set for May 3, 2019.

Read the cover story HERE.

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Deadpool 2 Lands On The Cover of Good Housekeeping Magazine

20th Century Fox‘s Deadpool 2 has landed on the cover of Good Housekeeping magazine.

“Deadpool’s persistence to be in Good Housekeeping was impressive – initially we had no idea who he was, let alone that he was a fan of the magazine,” Jane Francisco, Editor in Chief, Good Housekeeping said in a statement. “But after repeated attempts to ignore his… passion… we came to a compromise. He could appear in one issue, if he promised to stop leaving care packages at our editors’ homes and agreed to maintain a 50-foot distance from the Good Housekeeping offices and our staff.”

“After years of weekly emails and countless carrier pigeons, Good Housekeeping finally returned my calls,” Deadpool adds. “And while it’s a dream come true, apparently we have vastly different opinions on the definition of a ‘holiday spread’…”

The first poster for the film is also inside the magazine’s pages, which you can see below.

Ryan Reynolds is reprising his role as the Merc with a Mouth alongside Zazie Beetz as the luck-manipulating mutant Domino and Josh Brolin as Cable, the time-traveling son of the X-Men’s Cyclops. Jack Kesy (The Strain, Baywatch) is attached to play the film’s central villain, which, while unconfirmed, is rumored to be Irish mutant Black Tom Cassidy. Japanese actress Shioli Kutsuna and Julian Dennison (Hunt for the Wilderpeople) have also joined the film in mystery roles.

Other stars returning from the first Deadpool include Leslie Uggams as Blind Al, Morena Baccarin as Vanessa, Brianna Hildebrand as Negasonic Teenage Warhead, and Stefan Kapicic as the voice of Colossus.

Deadpool 2 is set to debut in theaters on June 1, 2018.

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Stranger Things 2 Returns To The Upside Down With New Monsters & More Spielberg

Stranger Things’ telekinetic teen Eleven (breakout star Millie Bobby Brown) may be able to lift government kidnapper vans but series creators Ross and Matt Duffer can rattle off the biggest movies of the summer of 1984 without blinking. Their passion for pop culture fueled the creation of Netflix’s Things, a tribute to the movies they loved as kids in North Carolina (think E.T., The Goonies, Stand by Me). “Obviously they’re nerdy, but that’s what makes them so cool,” says Brown. “It makes [Stranger Things] so authentic because it comes from their hearts.” The Duffers’ canny but old-fashioned combination of emotion and thrills drove the series — about four small-town Indiana friends who find themselves dealing with a portal to a different dimension — to monster-level success after its 2016 premiere. “I don’t think Netflix thought it was going to be as huge as it became, but neither did we,” admits Matt.

On Oct. 27, fans will finally get to see Things’ bigger, badder second installment. To celebrate the return, Entertainment Weekly has three different covers featuring the cast and you can read more about Stranger Things season 2 HERE.

The new issue of Entertainment Weekly will be on stands Friday.

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WIRED’s October Cover Story Features Blade Runner 2049

WIRED’s October cover story goes behind-the-scenes of the new Blade Runner sequel and features interviews with the film’s stars Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford, as well as director Denis Villeneuve, executive producer Ridley Scott, and many others. WIRED’s Brian Raftery visits the crew on set in Budapest for an exclusive look at the making of Blade Runner 2049, and to discuss the ongoing influence of the original film, and why the sequel will resonate with today’s audience.

Blade Runner 2049 lands in theaters next month, at the end of one of the most restless, fear-feeding years in recent memory. And it arrives just as many of the technologies at the center of both the original and sequel—advanced artificial intelligence, genetic engineering—are no longer pure fiction. The once far-off dystopia seems to inch closer every day, which means 2049 isn’t just another adventure in the Blade Runner world; it’s a darker iteration of what our own future could be.

“We’re so close,” Blade Runner screenwriter Hampton Fancher says of the future world that he, Ridely Scott, and Philip K. Dick conjured so many years ago.

It is this very closeness that could help 2049 succeed where Blade Runner first failed. The strongest sci-fi has always used the landscape of the future to help us process our worries about the present, and the nightmarish outcomes that audiences wanted nothing to do with back in 1982 are now talked about, debated, and noodled over by ever-growing numbers of people. Americans today feel the existential anxieties at the core of the Blade Runner universe more deeply and fully than almost anyone in 1982 could’ve imagined, and so a sequel that doubles down on dystopia could resonate in ways the original never could.

Read more HERE.

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