Tag Archives: Auction

1952 Topps Mickey Mantle Rookie Card Sells For $5.2 Million At Auction

An extremely rare 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle rookie baseball card became the highest-priced sports card ever, selling for $5.2 million, PWCC Marketplace announced.

The Topps card, rated PSA 9 based on the grading system for cards, blew by the previous record of $3.94 million, set in August for a signed Mike Trout 2009 rookie card – of which just one was created.

As for the Mantle card, there may be as few as three left in good condition.

Rob Gough, an actor and entrepreneur, purchased the card. Gough is the owner of several companies including DOPE CBD. He’s acted in Billionaire Boys Club, The Forgiven and Mom and Dad.

“The 1952 Topps Mantle is the holy grail of sports cards,” Gough said. “I’ve dreamt of owning a 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle since I was a kid collecting cards. It’s the Mona Lisa of sports cards and I’ve been searching for this high graded example talking to industry experts, dealers, auction houses, friends and I’m ecstatic that I’m now the proud owner of this iconic card.”

“Based on our research, this is the nicest looking 1952 Topps Mantle PSA 9 in existence,” Jesse Craig, director of business development at PWCC Marketplace, said in a press release.

The sky-high value of the Mantle card is due in part to the fact that in addition to being the Yankee legend’s rookie card, it’s from Topps’ first annual set – many of which were tossed into the Hudson River eight years later after they didn’t sell.

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Sealed Pokémon Base Set Booster Box Sells For Record $408,000 At Heritage Auctions

Demand for elite Pokémon collectibles continues to soar at Heritage Auctions, which sold a Pokémon First Edition Base Set Sealed Booster Box (Wizards of the Coast, 1999) for a world record-setting $408,000 Thursday afternoon.

The box sold during the second session of Heritage’s four-day Comics & Comic Art Auction, which runs through Sunday.

“Recent history has shown that the demand for First Edition Base Set Sealed Booster Boxes is soaring,” said Jesus Garcia, Trading Cards Expert in the Heritage Auctions Comics Department. “Based on the competitive bidding when Heritage Auctions sold a similar set in November, we expected the interest in this set to be even higher, and our collectors did not disappoint.”

Offered in its original shrink wrap, the First Edition Base Set Sealed Booster Box broke the previous world record for an auction sale, set when Heritage Auctions sold a similar booster box in November 2020 for $360,000. Still sealed in its original shrink wrap, the set was created in 1999 by Wizards of the Coast and set featured 102 cards, most notably the Charizard. Today, it is considered the pinnacle of Pokémon box collecting.

Due to their low print run, these box sets have become extremely scarce, especially those still in the original sealed state. The box contains 36 booster packs, each with 11 cards for a total of 396 cards, each of which likely is in GEM MINT condition because the packs have not yet been handled.

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Batman #1 Sells For $2.22 Million At Heritage Auctions To Shatter Caped Crusader’s World Record

The finest known copy of 1940’s Batman No. 1 sold Thursday for $2.22 million, far and away the highest price ever realized for a comic book starring Bruce Wayne and his caped-and-cowled alter ego.

The issue, the sole copy ever to receive a 9.4 grade from the Certified Guaranty Company, was already a record-setter before the start of Heritage Auctions’ four-day Comics and Comic Art event. A week before the Jan. 14-17 auction even began, Batman No. 1 crossed the $1.53-million mark, besting the previous world record set for a Batman title in November when Heritage sold 1939’s Detective Comics No. 27 for $1.5 million.

The book shattered estimates and expectations long before it was sold during the first session of the four-day event. It has seen more than two dozen bids since Christmas and accrued tens of thousands of pageviews worldwide; more than 700 Heritage clients also kept close tabs on its progress as it made its way toward the auction block.

By Wednesday afternoon, all that interest had pushed bids on Batman No. 1 to $1.89 million with buyer’s premium. Shortly before the auction opened at noon Central Standard Time Thursday, it had climbed to $1.95 million. Heated bidding raised the final price to $2.22 million.

This issue of Batman No. 1, featuring the debuts of the Joker and Catwoman, is now the most expensive comic book ever sold by Heritage Auctions.

“We knew when the book came in that it was beyond special, that it was a once-in-a-lifetime offering – from appearance, its blindingly bright cover to its white pages, to provenance,” says Heritage Auctions Senior Vice President Ed Jaster of this newly discovered copy. “As I like to say, this is just a breathtaking book in so many ways. So we are not at all surprised that this has become a record-setting issue. But we are extraordinarily proud and honored to have brought it to market, to have done justice to its owner and to have found it a new home.”

Until Thursday, the highest price Heritage had ever realized for a Batman No. 1 was in 2013, when the Dallas-based auction house sold a CGC NM- 9.2 copy for $567,625.

There are myriad reasons why Batman No. 1 is coveted by collectors and cherished by fans. First, there’s the iconic, oft-imitated cover image – Batman and Robin, smiling at each other as they swing across the Gotham City skyline against a bright yellow backdrop. Then there’s the back-page pin-up “autographed” by the Caped Crusader and his fledgling sidekick promising “bigger and better thrills.”

Inside, readers are presented with “The Legend of the Batman,” an origin story, which first appeared in Detective Comics No. 33, filled with grief and anger that will one day be retold, endlessly, in movies and television shows built upon that two-page narrative. After that comes the debut of a villain more popular now than ever before, star of his own blockbuster franchise: “a man with a changeless masklike face but for the eyes – burning, hate-filled eyes” called only the Joker.

Then, a few pages later, Batman squares off against the monsters of Hugo Strange, who made his first appearance only months earlier in Detective Comics No. 36 and quickly became one of the hero’s first recurring villains. A few pages after that follows another iconic debut: a burglar and “beautiful young woman” called The Cat, who, 80 years later, is married to Batman in an acclaimed new book penned by writer Tom King, who won an Eisner Award last year for his run on Batman.

This copy, too, has a storied background, having spent the last 39 years in the hands of a collector who bought it from a renowned comic-book shop in Houston.

In 1979, Billy T. Giles moved from Shreveport, La., to Houston, when Texas Eastern Transmission Pipeline Co. relocated its headquarters to Texas. He fell in with the local comics shops and dealers, and helped his son complete an Amazing Spider-Man collection and obtain other key comics.

Giles then decided to collect Batman for himself, starting with the purchase of six of the first nine issues from Camelot Bookstore owner Willie Patterson’s personal collection.

Camelot was located in downtown Houston, where Giles spent many lunch hours discussing comics — especially the Batman No. 1 — with Patterson. Around that time, Patterson advertised Camelot’s copy of Batman No. 1 in the Comics Buyer’s Guide for $5,000, at the time a costly investment. When it failed to sell at such a steep price Billy offered him $3,000 cash, which Patterson happily accepted.

The first Batman became Billy’s, and friends and neighbors teased him for spending that much for a comic book they insisted might one day be worthless. History, of course, proved otherwise.

When Billy retired from Texas Eastern, he began a comic-book business called BTandWDGiles, and spent the rest of his life buying and selling comics; his passion had turned professional. When he died in 2019, Billy’s son William inherited his father’s remarkable collection, and a year later decided it was someone else’s turn to own the finest known – and, now, record-shattering – copy of Batman No. 1.

“It was time for somebody else to have it,” William says. “Dad would have been glad his story is being told – ecstatic, really. What he did to get that book and how he took care of it. He always knew it was the finest and would have been so happy it has been recognized as the very best. So I am thrilled that I can use it to honor my father. Sure, I am a little sad seeing the book go. But I wish the new owner the best and hope her or she enjoys it as much as I have.”

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One of The World’s Best Copies of Captain America Comics # 1 Heads To Auction

Captain America turned 80 years old this week. He still doesn’t look a day over 30. It must be the experimental serum. Or the ice bath.

Though the date on Timely’s Captain America Comics No. 1 reads March 1941, the first issue to feature Steve Rogers, sidekick Bucky and forever-enemy Red Skull actually arrived on newsstands on Dec. 20, 1940. To commemorate the landmark occasion, Heritage Auctions offers one of finest known copies in the January 14-17 Comics & Comic Art event.

The Captain America Comics No. 1 in this auction is graded VF+ 8.5 by Certified Guaranteed Company – one of only three copies to receive such a mark, with only six known to be in better condition. In almost 20 years, Heritage has offered only two finer than the one that is showcased in an event that also features the best-known Batman No. 1 ever to reach an auction block.

“Either one of these books would be the highlight and centerpiece of any auction, but to have them both in the same event is nothing short of extraordinary,” says Heritage Auctions Senior Vice President Ed Jaster. “These are the titles, the heroes, the writers and the artists that have defined comic books – and now cinema – for eight decades. And to see two extraordinary firsts in such remarkable condition in the same auction 80 years after they were published is something special not likely to happen again.”

Captain America’s debut, the handiwork of not-yet-legends Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, coincided with the first day of the three-day Christmas blitz on Liverpool by the German Luftwaffe. The United States was still a year away from entering World War II. But there was the star-spangled Cap on the comic’s cover delivering a right cross to Hitler in the sock heard ’round the world.

“The team of Simon and Kirby brought anatomy back into comic books,” cartoonist Jules Feiffer wrote in his 1965 book The Great Comic Book Heroes, which for many fledgling fans served as introduction to and explanation of the medium’s Golden Age.

“Not that the other artists didn’t draw well … but no one could put quite as much anatomy into a hero as Simon and Kirby,” he wrote. “Muscles stretched magically, fore-shortened shockingly. Legs were never less than four feet apart when a punch was thrown. Every panel was a population explosion – casts of thousands: all fighting, leaping, crawling. … Speed was the thing, rocking, uproarious speed. Blue Bolt, The Sandman, The Newsboy Legion, The Boy Commandoes and best of all: Captain America and Bucky.”

The issue’s storyline, in which a “frail young man” named Steve Rogers is injected with a serum that gives him “the strength and the will to safeguard our shores,” is familiar now even to someone who has never picked up a comic. It has served as template for a tentpole franchise; made a modern star of a World War II hero; and remains as timely as the name of the comic company that published Captain America’s stories before it was made Marvel.

Cap has been many things in the 80 years since his debut: Sentinel of Liberty, Commie Smasher, Invader, Avenger, time-traveler, agent of S.H.I.E.L.D, pawn of Hydra. But in the end …

“Captain America isn’t a man. It’s an idea,” Mark Waid wrote in 2019’s Marvel Comics No. 1000, which celebrated the company’s 80th anniversary. “It’s a commitment to fight every day for justice, for acceptance and equality, for the rights of everyone in this nation.”

And it all began here.

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Highest-Graded Copy of 1940’s Batman #1 Heads To Auction In January

Heritage Auctions will begin the new year by offering the finest-known copy of 1940’s Batman No. 1 – which until now has never been sold at auction.

This near-mint issue, the sole copy ever to receive a 9.4 grade from the Certified Guaranty Company, is the centerpiece of the Dallas-based house’s Jan. 14-15 Comics & Comic Art event. And this unrestored copy comes to market only weeks after Heritage sold a 7.0-graded copy of Detective Comics No. 27 for $1.5 million. For the moment, at least, that’s the highest price ever paid for a Dark Knight title.

“This Batman No. 1 is just breathtaking,” says Heritage Auctions Senior Vice President Ed Jaster of this newly certified, newly discovered copy estimated to sell for more than $1 million.

“Of course, no one can say for certain, but it’s highly unlikely that a better copy is anywhere out there,” Jaster says. “It has great color and white pages – not off-white, not off-off-white, but white,” as though it has just been bought off the newsstand. “And the color strike is exceptional.”

This extraordinary book – not just the first issue of Batman, but still one of the best – provides the template for countless Dark Knight tales to follow over the next 80 years.

First, there’s the iconic, oft-imitated cover image – Batman and Robin, smiling at each other as they swing across the Gotham City skyline against a bright yellow backdrop. Then there’s the back-page pin-up “autographed” by the Caped Crusader and his fledgling sidekick promising “bigger and better thrills.”

Inside, readers are presented with “The Legend of the Batman,” an origin story, which first appeared in Detective Comics No. 33, filled with grief and anger that will one day be retold, endlessly, in movies and television shows built upon that two-page narrative. After that comes the debut of a villain more popular now than ever before, star of his own blockbuster franchise: “a man with a changeless masklike face but for the eyes – burning, hate-filled eyes” called only the Joker.

Then, a few pages later, Batman squares off against the monsters of Hugo Strange, who made his first appearance only months earlier in Detective Comics No. 36 and quickly became one of the hero’s first recurring villains. A few pages after that follows another iconic debut: a burglar and “beautiful young woman” called The Cat, who, 80 years later, is married to Batman in an acclaimed new book penned by writer Tom King, who won an Eisner Award last year for his run on Batman.

This copy, too, has a storied background, having spent the last 38 years in the hands of a collector who bought it from a renowned comic-book shop in Houston.

In 1979, Billy T. Giles moved from Shreveport, La., to Houston, when Texas Eastern Transmission Pipeline Co. relocated its headquarters to Texas. Billy fell in with the local comics shops and dealers, and helped his son complete an Amazing Spider-Man collection and obtain other key comics. 

Billy then decided to collect Batman for himself, starting with the purchase of six of the first nine issues from Camelot Bookstore owner Willie Patterson’s personal collection. 

Camelot was located in downtown Houston, where Billy spent many lunch hours discussing comics — especially the Batman No. 1 — with Patterson. Around that time, Patterson advertised Camelot’s copy of Batman No. 1 in the Comics Buyer’s Guide for $5,000, at the time a costly investment. When it failed to sell at such a steep price – remember, this is around 1982 – Billy offered him $3,000 cash, which Willie happily accepted.

The first Batman became Billy’s, and friends and neighbors teased him for spending that much for a comic book they insisted might one day be worthless. History, of course, proved otherwise.

When Billy retired from Texas Eastern, he began a comic-book business called BTandWDGiles, and spent the rest of his life buying and selling comics; his passion had turned professional. When he died in 2019, Billy’s son inherited his father’s remarkable collection, and a year later decided it was someone else’s turn to own the finest known copy of Batman No. 1.

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A World-Record Day For Batman As Detective Comics Number 27 Sells For $1.5 Million Dollars

A copy of 1939’s Detective Comics 27 sold Thursday for $1.5 million – the highest price ever realized for any Batman comic book.

The issue containing the Dark Knight’s debut was sold during the first session of Heritage Auctions’ four-day Comics & Comic Art event that runs through Nov. 22. Thursday’s sale of this unrestored copy, which is graded Fine/Very Fine 7.0 by Certified Guaranty Company, broke a decade-old record for a Batman title.

Previously, the highest price paid for an issue of Detective Comics No. 27 was set on Feb. 25, 2010, when Heritage Auctions sold an 8.0-graded copy of the book for $1,075,000.

Detective Comics No. 27 is now the most expensive comic book ever sold by the Dallas-based auction house, the world’s leading auctioneer of comic books and original comic art. For the last year, that title belonged to the CGC 9.4 copy of Marvel Comics No. 1 that sold in November 2019 for $1.26 million.

There are only two 7.0 copies of Detective Comics No. 27 in CGC’s census. And, only five known unrestored copies have graded higher in the service’s census, which makes the issue that sold Thursday something of a Holy Grail offering. Even before the live auction opened at noon CT Thursday, online bidding for Detective Comics No. 27 had already exceeded $1 million even without the buyer’s premium.

Batman may have been conceived as a hybrid of several predecessors, among them The Shadow, the Green Hornet and Zorro. But artist Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger’s six-page story “The Case of the Chemical Syndicate,” found in this record-setting book, already included the hallmarks of the Caped Crusader to come: his secret identity as wealthy playboy Bruce Wayne, his friendship with Commissioner Jim Gordon, and the cape and cowl and costume that rendered him “the most flamboyant masked avenger of them all,” in the words of Batman and DC Comics historian Les Daniels.

It’s little wonder that Detective Comics No. 27 currently sits at No. 2 on the Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide’s Top 100 Golden Age Comics List, behind only Superman’s bow in Action Comics No. 1.

But for today, at least, Superman has to take a back seat to the Batman.

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Alamo Drafthouse Auctioning Off Rare Mondo Prints

Alamo Drafthouse Cinema is inviting guests to bid on the largest and most comprehensive auction of Mondo prints ever. Drawn entirely from Alamo Drafthouse founder Tim League’s personal collection of nearly 2,000 Mondo limited edition prints, the auction begins Sunday, November 29th in partnership with eMoviePoster.com. Bidding for each item begins at just $1.

“I love Mondo posters. I own quite a few of them and the interpretations of my films by the Mondo crew are a source of great pride to me,” says Shaun of the Dead director Edgar Wright. “It is clear they are in the middle of a very cool Venn diagram composed of huge artistic talent and a genuine love of movies.”

The auction will begin at 5:00PM on November 29th and close on December 13th. Bidders must have a free account at eMovieposter.com to bid. Everything in the auction is certified original and in mint or near mint condition. Each poster will be meticulously inspected and graded prior to the auction by the eMovieposter team.

From Tim League: “Cinemas across the country are facing extraordinary financial hardships. We are legally unable to open many of our venues, and where we can open, our capacity is significantly reduced, the product – the supply of blockbuster films – has evaporated, and our debt from accrued rent during closure continues to mount.

100% of proceeds from the sale will go towards paying staff of the Alamo Drafthouse and paying debt and expenses accrued during the COVID closures. These next four to six months are critical and the proceeds from this auction will help immensely.

If you are a Mondo collector, if you have a movie fan in your life who would like something unique under the Christmas tree this year, or if you have never purchased a poster before, we invite everyone to explore the incredible history of nearly 15 years of beautiful poster design in this auction.

Alamo Drafthouse’s history of creating special hand-silkscreened event posters dates back to early partnerships with then gig poster luminary and Mondo co-founder Rob Jones on posters for QT Fest and early outdoor Rolling Roadshow events like Cinemapocalypse. Later, Mondo Tees – the tiny iron-on T-shirt shop in the original Alamo Drafthouse’s ticket booth – began creating and releasing collectible prints that became highly sought-after, and revolutionized the film poster world.

Mondo’s reputation for graphic excellence continues with inventive, artist-driven designs for everything from the latest studio blockbusters to cult classics. That commitment to has led the company to work with a roster of world-renowned artists that include Aaron Horkey, Becky Cloonan, Francesco Francavilla, Frank Kozik, Jermaine Rogers, Jason Edmiston, Jay Ryan, Jay Shaw, Jock, Tula Lotay, Laurent Durieux, Matt Taylor, Olly Moss, Stan Sakai, Shepard Fairey, Drew Struzan, Vania Zouravliov, and many more.

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Heritage Auction To Auction The Classic Variant Cover From Dark Knight Returns: The Golden Child By Rafael Grampá

“The Golden Child” is Frank Miller’s triumphant return to the world of the Dark Knight, along with superstar artist Rafael Grampá, the mastermind behind the groundbreaking “Mesmo Delivery.” 

This “The Future is Young” Rafael Grampá Dark Knight Returns: Golden Child Variant Cover original art cover shows the older, and former Robin, Carrie Kelley, as the current Batwoman. Carrie was created by Miller in his Dark Knight Returns run, and stands among the few who are credited with saving Batman’s life. 

On November 26, 2019, DC Comics posted the promotional artwork for this series on their social media, where you can see Batwoman throwing a Molotov cocktail, mixed with the phrase “The Future Is Young”. But as soon as it was released, the publisher decided to delete the promo, and in a movement of revolt against possible censorship by China, protesters in Hong Kong adopted the art as a symbol of the protests. The controversy took on worldwide proportions and this art created by Grampá became featured in The GuardianNewsweekBusiness InsiderEntertainment Weekly, New York Post, Rolling Stone, and in hundreds of other vehicles around the planet. 

The Future is Young – Dark Knight Returns: Golden Child Variant Cover Art
By Rafael Grampá Created in ink and graphite on Bristol board 
Image area of 11″ x 16″
Includes a signed Batman print
In Excellent condition
Item was consigned by the artist to Heritage Auction

Collectors are invited to place a bid until September 13th 2020 HERE.

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Pokémon Card, One of Only Seven Made, Could Be Worth $100K+

A pristine copy of arguably the most sought-after Pokémon card in the world could bring $100,000 or more in Heritage Auctions’ Comics & Comic Art Auction July 9-12 in Dallas, Texas.

Pokémon Super Secret Battle “No. 1 Trainer” Trainer Promo Hologram Trading Card (1999) is one of just seven copies known to exist, and of those, six carry a PSA Gem Mint 10 grade.

“This unique card can easily be the centerpiece of any serious Pokémon card collection,” said Jesus Garcia, Assistant Comics & Comic Art Operations Supervisor at Heritage Auctions. “These cards were given to the winners of regional Pokémon tournaments, of which there were only seven, making this an exceedingly rare prize among collectors. The perfect grade is important, of course, but the sheer rarity of the card is the main reason why it is an inarguable must-have for serious Pokémon collectors.”

The card reads “The Pokémon Card Game Official Tournament’s champion is recognized here, and this honor is praised. By presenting this card, you may gain preferential entry into the Secret Super Battle.”

So secretive was the tournament that the competitors only found out the location of the final round after winning a regional tournament. The finals took place Aug. 22, 1999, in Tokyo.

The Pikachu Illustrator is widely regarded as the most expensive Pokémon card; according to psacard.com, there are 19 Pikachu Illustrator cards certified. But the Super Secret Battle No. 1 Trainer card is even more rare, with just seven copies known to exist.

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Kurt Cobain’s ‘MTV Unplugged’ Guitar Could Sell For $1 Million

The guitar that Kurt Cobain played during his 1993 “MTV Unplugged” performance is expected to sell at auction next month for at least $1 million. The rare D-18E guitar is listed with a number of other items once owned by the Nirvana frontman, who died by suicide in 1994, approximately five months after the New York show.

“This important guitar has earned its rightful place in Rock ‘N’ Roll history as the instrument played by one of rock’s most influential musicians and icons in one of the greatest and most memorable live performances of all time,” said Darren Julien, President of Julien’s Auctions, in a press release. The auction house is hosting the sale in Beverly Hills, Hollywood.

The guitar was previously owned by Cobain’s daughter Frances Bean Cobain, who reportedly gave it up during an acrimonious divorce from her former husband, musician Isaiah Silva.

Just the seventh of only 302 D-18Es built, the guitar was customized by Cobain with a Bartolini pickup. The guitar will arrive in an original hardshell case decorated by Cobain, along with a half-used pack of Martin guitar strings, three picks, and a suede “stash” bag decorated with a miniature silver spoon, fork, and knife. It will be on display starting May 15 at the Hard Rock Cafe in Piccadilly Circus and at Julien’s Auctions Gallery in Beverly Hills starting June 15 ahead of its auction on Friday, June 19 – Saturday, June 20.

More info HERE.

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