Tag Archives: Comic Books

Spider-Man Grabs Coffee

To celebrate Spider-Man: Homecoming swinging into theaters this week, Sony Pictures set up hidden cameras at a Starbucks in New York City and watched as Spider-Man dropped down from the ceiling to grab his coffee and surprise unsuspecting customers.

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Did Spider-Man Have A Cameo In Iron Man 2?

A very cool fan theory has been confirmed by Spider-Man: Homecoming star Tom Holland. The theory is that the little Iron Man fan who holds up his hand to fight one of the Hammer drones in the 2010 film was none other than Peter Parker.

Holland confirmed the Iron Man 2 Spider-Man, or at least Peter Parker, appearance.

“It is Peter Parker,” he says. “I can confirm that, that is Peter Parker. I can confirm that as of today. I literally had a conversation with Kevin Feige only 20 minutes ago. Maybe I’ve just done a big, old spoiler, but it’s out there now. It’s cool. I like the idea that Peter Parker has been in the universe since the beginning.”

A young Peter Parker / Spider-Man (Tom Holland), who made his sensational debut in Captain America: Civil War, begins to navigate his newfound identity as the web-slinging super hero in Spider-Man: Homecoming. Thrilled by his experience with the Avengers, Peter returns home, where he lives with his Aunt May (Marisa Tomei), under the watchful eye of his new mentor Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr.). Peter tries to fall back into his normal daily routine – distracted by thoughts of proving himself to be more than just your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man – but when the Vulture (Michael Keaton) emerges as a new villain, everything that Peter holds most important will be threatened.

Spider-Man: Homecoming also stars Zendaya, Jon Favreau, Donald Glover and Tyne Daly.

Spider-Man: Homecoming swings into theaters on July 7.

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Sideshow Collectibles Presents: Capturing Archetypes, Volume 3: Astonishing Avengers, Adversaries, and Antiheroes

Following the success of Capturing Archetypes, Volume 1 and Volume 2, this deluxe third volume showcases not only beautifully photographed collectibles but also discussions and documentation exploring the creation of these pieces from the artists themselves.

Capturing Archetypes, Volume 3 is a loving homage to the fandoms that Sideshow Collectibles represents. Whether it’s instantly recognizable characters from movies, comic books, and pop culture or Sideshow’s original creations—such as the marvelously macabre Court of the Dead—every piece, from Spider-Man to Catwoman, is created with the passion, devotion, and enthusiasm of true fans.

The latest in digital rendering techniques meet classical sculpture and fine art in Sideshow’s studio, where every medium and every tool, old or new, is dedicated to one purpose—the crafting of the highest quality museum-worthy collectibles. Each page of this stunning art book celebrates the countless hours of hard work and dedication put into the creation of each of Sideshow’s masterpieces. Featuring iconic and universally beloved characters from franchises such as Star Wars, DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Indiana Jones, and others, this collection celebrates Sideshow Collectibles’ astonishing ability to capture the essence of archetypal characters in its phenomenal art pieces.

Readers will be able to step inside the world of a “modern renaissance studio” and see their favorite characters brought to life by master craftsmen and women.

The 272 page book will be published on November 7, 2017 and can be ordered HERE.

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Batclimb Compilation

One of our favorite things about the ’60s Batman TV series were the celebrity cameos as the Dynamic Duo scaled a building with their grappling hook.

Featuring Jerry Lewis, Sammy Davis Jr., Van Williams, Bruce Lee, Art Linkletter, Don Ho, Col. Klink, Lurch etc.

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Justice League Elite-Tek Batmobile

Straight from the epic movie blockbuster, Justice League, and zooming into kids’ hands everywhere is the awesome Elite-Tek Batmobile styled just like the one in the film!

The iconic Batman vehicle roars into New York Toy Fair and comes to life in epic scale with remote-controlled functionality. Check out the cool features in the video: smoke releases from exhaust pipe, missiles move on hood of car, the engine roars and the wheels are all decked out with armor. If that isn’t enough to get you going, through an app-enabled tablet or smartphone, fans can assume the role as the Caped Crusader and take complete control of the vehicle all from the palm of their hand! The Elite-Tek Batmobile also includes a camera in the cockpit so you can drive from Batman’s point of view via an app-controlled device. Includes special “jump mode” feature that elevates the Batmobile with hydraulic-like movement. The included Batman figure has full shoulder movement to steer the wheel. There’s no other set of wheels like it!

The Justice League Elite-Tek Batmobile will be available this fall for $249.99.

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Jack Kirby To Be Honored At D23 Expo 2017

This July, the legendary Jack Kirby will be honored for his remarkable creative achievements as a Disney Legend in a ceremony to be held at this year’s D23 Expo in Anaheim, California. Hosted by Disney Chairman and CEO Bob Iger, the Disney Legends Award ceremony will take place at 10am on Friday, July 14, in Hall D23.

Jack Kirby first grabbed our attention in the spring of 1941 with Captain America, a character he created with Joe Simon. Kirby then followed this debut with a prolific output of comic books in the Western, Romance, and Monster genres – all a prelude to his defining work helping to create the foundations of the Marvel Universe. For the next decade, Kirby and co-creator Stan Lee would introduce a mind-boggling array of new characters and teams — including the Avengers, Hulk, Thor, Iron Man, Silver Surfer, Ant-Man, Wasp, Black Panther, S.H.I.E.L.D., and the Inhumans. Kirby was inducted into the Eisner Hall of Fame’s 1987 inaugural class and continued creating comics throughout the ’90s before passing away in 1994.

Other honorees of this year’s Legends Award are Carrie Fisher, Clyde “Gerry” Geronimi, Manuel Gonzales, Mark Hamill, Stan Lee, Garry Marshall, Julie Taymor, and Oprah Winfrey.

Tickets for D23 Expo 2017 are available for $81 for one-day adult admission and $59 for children 3–9. Members of D23: The Official Disney Fan Club can purchase tickets for $72 for a one-day adult admission and $53 for children 3–9. Multi-day tickets are also available.

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Sideshow Announces Batman: The Dark Knight Returns Blue Version Bust Comic-Con 2017 Exclusive

Sideshow is teaming up with Prime 1 Studio for a new San Diego Comic-Con 2017 Exclusive. The Batman: The Dark Knight Returns “Blue Version” Bust is Sideshow’s first Comic-Con 2017 Exclusive. Sideshow has shared a preview image for the bust. They will be opening pre-orders on Thursday, June 22, 2017 sometime between Noon and 3:00 PM Pacific Time.

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Spider-Man Interactive App-Enabled Super Hero By Sphero

Join forces with Spider-Man and enter the Marvel Universe like never before. This voice interactive Super Hero features hours of entertainment. Embark on missions where you’ll take on the city’s worst criminals and battle Spidey’s most notorious villains. Every decision you make creates a new path forward, so your unique journey will continue to evolve. Spidey’s Wi-Fi capabilities allow for new missions, games, stories, jokes, and other content updates. When not fighting bad guys, hang out and strike up some banter with your friendly neighborhood hero. Spidey’s reactions and signature snarky attitude are sure to keep you on your toes.

Built with fully animated LCD eyes and motion detection, Spider-Man is as expressive as he is perceptive. Watch him react to people passing by, set him to wake you up, or have him guard your room to stop snooping siblings. The tech in this interactive, immersive, and intellectual Spidey empowers you to be his heroic ally.

Features

– Wise-crackin’ Spidey – Talk to Spidey using a variety of phrases. But be warned – he’s quite the jokester!
– Super Smarts – Earn Spider-Man’s trust by working together to defeat baddies.
– Team Up – Go on missions & battle villains. Every decision influences the adventure.
– Emotive Eyes – Spidey’s LCD eyes express his every thought and emotion.
– Spider-Sense – Spidey’s built-in IR sensor allows him to detect and react to movement.
– Ultimate Experience – Spidey’s web connection allows you to get content updates.
– Create an alter ego – Create your Super Hero identity and keep tabs on your accomplishments.
– Write your story – Every decision creates a new path forward, making every adventure unique.

Order HERE for $149.99.

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Is Pitting Characters Against Each Other The New Black?

Last year has seen beloved characters from both of the major comic book universes get involved in fierce fights within their ranks. Captain America: Civil War pitted half of the Avengers against the other half, while DC made viewers choose sides in Batman v Superman – who will you be backing

Similar plot lines are set to be used in upcoming movies, too: as the “Thor: Ragnarok” trailer has shown us, Thor will be up against his Earth-based brother-in-arms, The Incredible Hulk, and there are many “versus” movies coming up later on. “Heroes vs. heroes” and “monsters vs. monsters” is not a new concept. The first one has been repeatedly used in comic books, yet it may prove to be unusual for many moviegoers outside the US, who are used to knowing clearly who the hero and the villain are on the silver screen. The “monster vs. monster” part is also well-known for Gojira fans – the Japanese radioactive lizard-creature-thing has fought monsters like Mothra, Ghidorah, Ebirah, Varan, Manda, Baragon, even its own mechanical replica repeatedly in the three “Gojira VS Mekagojira” films.

Moviegoers are used to having a clear distinction between a hero and a villain. Even if the villain is a bit shady at times – the methods of Batman, especially in his last appearance, are unusually brutal for a positive character – he IS the positive character in the movie. This clash between good and evil is the basis of most plots, and most of the times of the related materials spun off of it. It might be a bit of an unusual example but here it is: one of the main plot points the 7Sultans’ “The Dark Knight Rises” slot machine, inspired by Christopher Nolan’s take on the masked vigilante of Gotham City, was the duel between Batman and Bane, fought “mano a mano” in front of the game’s spinning reels. While the fight was not as dramatic as the silver screen version – after all, the game was meant to be fun (and possibly even profitable) for 7Sultans players of all ages and genres. And not everyone appreciates gratuitous brutality.

Pitting monsters against each other is not something new in Western filmmaking either. Back in the golden age of horror film, some of the most famous movie monsters would often fight each other on the silver screen. Think “Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man” (1943), “Dracula vs. Frankenstein” (1971), and more recently “Freddy vs. Jason” in 2003 and “Frankenstein vs. The Mummy” in 2015. The latter two were both miserable excuses for a monster movie, but they followed – or even revived – a trend of setting up perfect popcorn-munching monster brawls. Luckily for us, today’s “hero vs. hero” movies are a far deeper and more meaningful than anything ever to be released on the silver screen, so we won’t have to descend into the B-territory while seeing them.

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Adam West, Star of TV’s Batman, Dies at 88

Adam West, who donned a cape, cowl and tights to became an overnight sensation in 1966 as the star of the campy “Batman” TV series, has died, according to a family statement. He was 88.

West, who later lamented being typecast as the iconic Caped Crusader but eventually embraced having been part of American pop culture, died Friday in Los Angeles after a short battle with leukemia, according to multiple reports.

A former Warner Bros. contract player, West was appearing in TV commercials in the mid-1960s to help pay the rent. But several commercials he did for Nestle’s Quik chocolate powder — parodies of the popular James Bond movies in which West played a dry-witted character called Captain Q — had an unexpected outcome.

They caught the attention of 20th Century Fox TV producer William Dozier, who was looking for someone to star as Gotham City millionaire Bruce Wayne and his crime-fighting alter-ego, Batman, in a farcical new series for ABC.

Based on the DC character created by artist Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger in 1939, “Batman” debuted in January 1966 as a twice-weekly half-hour program — 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays, with the Wednesday episode ending on a cliffhanger.

West knew his life would never be the same the night the heavily promoted first episode aired.

“I stopped at the market on the way home,” he told Esquire magazine in 2004. “I thought, ‘Tonight, I just want to be alone. I’ll stop, get a steak and a six pack, whatever, then go home and watch the debut of the show.’

“As I walked through the checkout line, I heard people saying, ‘C’mon, c’mon, hurry up. “Batman” is coming on!’ And I said to myself, ‘Goodbye, anonymity.’ ”

The tongue-in-cheek series roared into public consciousness like the Batmobile out of the Batcave.

With West as the strait-laced crime fighter who spoke with what has been described as ironic earnestness and Burt Ward as his youthfully exuberant sidekick, Robin, “Batman” was a pop culture phenomenon in a decade that was full of them.

“This whole thing is an insane, mad fantasy world,” West said of the show in a Chicago Daily News interview shortly before its debut. “And my goal is to become American’s biggest put-on.”

It was high camp indeed, with fight scenes punctuated by comic book-style “POW!” “BOP!” and “WHAP!” exclamations flashing on the screen and an array of guest-star villains that included Frank Gorshin as the Riddler, Burgess Meredith as the Penguin, Cesar Romero as the Joker and Julie Newmar and Eartha Kitt as Catwoman.

West quickly learned the key to slipping into the Batman persona.

“You pull on the mask and the utility belt and the gloves, and you must believe the moment that’s done that you really are Batman,” West said in a late 1980s interview on TV’s “Entertainment Tonight.”

“What I loved about Batman was his total lack of awareness when it came to his interaction with the outside world,” West told London’s Independent newspaper in 2005. “He actually believed nobody could recognize him on the phone, when he was being Bruce Wayne, even though he made no attempt to disguise his voice.”

In the first episode of the series, he recalled, “Batman goes into a nightclub in the cowl, cape and bat gloves. When the maitre d’ says: ‘Ringside table, Batman?’ he replies, ‘No thank you. I’ll stand at the bar. I would not wish to be conspicuous.’ ”

In June 1966, The Times reported that “Batman” had been a “life-transforming” success for West: Fan mail was arriving “by the wagonsful” — as were requests for everything from personal appearances to locks of his hair.

But West, The Times said, had “no panic about becoming solely and totally identified with the caped role.”

“I love doing the show, and frankly it’s given me more identification than any three movies could have,” West told The Times. “What I’ve got to feel is that if I can make a success of this characterization, I can make a success of other characterizations.”

The “Batman” series spawned a 1966 movie version and an array of merchandise, including lunchboxes, dolls and toy Batmobiles.

Both nights of “Batman” were rated in the top-10 list of shows for the 1965-66 season. But as with any fad, the show’s popularity eventually began to fade.

By the fall of 1967, the series was cut back to once a week, and it was canceled in March 1968.

Before his overnight stardom as Batman, West had made guest appearances on TV series such as “Cheyenne,” “Maverick” and “77 Sunset Strip” and had been a regular for a season on Robert Taylor’s series “The Detectives.”

He also had roles in movies such as “Tammy and the Doctor” (1963), “Robinson Crusoe on Mars” (1964) and “The Outlaws Is Coming!” (1965, opposite the Three Stooges).

But after “Batman” ended, West told Scripps Howard News Service in 2001, “It was a bleak time in my career because of typecasting in ‘Batman.’ I couldn’t get away from it.”

As he told the Orange County Register in 1989: “I was almost to the finish line for a lot of big, leading-man type roles that I really wanted, but I’d always come in second or third. Somebody in charge would always say, ‘Hey, what are you guys doing? You can’t put Batman in bed with Faye Dunaway.”

West went on to do guest shots on “Fantasy Island” and “Laverne & Shirley” and other TV shows. He also appeared in movies such as “The Marriage of a Young Stockbroker” (1971), “Hooper” (1978) and “The Happy Hooker Goes Hollywood” (1980).

In 1986, he starred as the police captain in the 1986 NBC sitcom “The Last Precinct,” but the series was quickly canceled. He also voiced a few TV cartoon versions of “Batman” over the years and more recently provided the voice for Mayor Adam West in the animated comedy TV series “Family Guy.”

In time, West came to appreciate having played Batman.

“The reaction has been so positive and good for me that I love it now,” he told The Times in 2009. “How could I not? I would hate to be a bitter, aging actor. I’ve been so fortunate to have this opportunity to bring Batman alive on the screen.”

As for the newer, darker depictions of Gotham City on the big screen, West said they “are grim, Gothic, full of explosions, mayhem. It’s the way of things, I suppose; the whole world seems darker.”

But, he said, “I look at [it] this way: They’ve got ‘The Dark Knight,’ and I was the bright knight. Or maybe I was even … the neon knight.”

West is survived by his wife, Marcelle, six children, five grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

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