Tag Archives: Entertainment Weekly

Marvel Studios’ WandaVision: Entertainment Weekly Welcomes You To The Wanda Years

 

As Marvel Studios gets ready to launch the first of their original television series, exclusively for Disney+, Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany reprise their roles as Wanda Maximoff and Vision, respectively, on the cover of Entertainment Weekly in support of their series WandaVision.

The new EW issue, arriving this week, gives us an in-depth behind-the-scenes look at the Marvel Studios’ original series, ahead of its Disney+ debut, and its wonderfully weird send-up of sitcoms past.

WandaVision, starring Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany, is a blend of classic television and the Marvel Cinematic Universe in which Wanda Maximoff and Vision—two super-powered beings living idealized suburban lives—begin to suspect that everything is not as it seems.

Read the cover story HERE.

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Stephen King’s TV Reign: The Author Discusses Mr. Mercedes, The Stand, And The Outsider

With America experiencing what’s objectively its most terrifying year of the 21st century, it’s perhaps only appropriate that the master of horror is having one of his best.

Stephen King may be well into his fourth decade as a blockbuster storyteller, yet TV adaptations of his work have never been more popular. There’s HBO’s stealth breakout The Outsider, which launched in January; CBS All Access’ take on King’s suddenly timely pandemic classic The Stand which premieres in December, and Audience Network’s adaptation of King’s Bill Hodges crime novel trilogy Mr. Mercedes, which moves to its new home on Peacock on Thursday, Oct. 15. Not to mention, King released another best-selling book this year (a quartet of novellas under the title If It Bleeds) and has two more planned for 2021.

Entertainment Weekly spoke with King about all his TV projects and, of course, dipped a bit into politics as well. We start with Mr. Mercedes, a series that received strong praise from critics (with a 93 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes) yet reached relatively few viewers on the now-defunct Audience Network. King hopes the drama will have a better shot at finding mainstream success when its first two seasons come to Peacock this week.

“I’m so happy that Peacock is doing this because I felt like with Mr. Mercedes at AT&T we had brought a stadium show to a folk club,” King says. “Now people are going to get a chance to see it.”

Read the interview HERE.

The highlight of the interview was that King will have a second book coming out in 2020…

EW: You have a Hard Case Crime book, titled Later, coming in 2021. But I look at your website pretty regularly and it’s unusual for you not to have at least two upcoming books on your site. And so I’m wondering if there is another new title you’re working on that you can tease?

King: There will be two next year. I don’t want people to get used to that or think that that’s the norm. It’s not. But it’s just the way things happened. So there is another, but I don’t want to say anything about it yet.

No word yet on the book title or subject matter but THE FIRE WIRE will be sure to post about it as soon as the information becomes available!

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Stephen King’s Maine

Stephen King is synonymous with the Pine Tree State. The best-selling author, 73, has lived in the land of lobsters and lighthouses nearly his entire life, using the chilly surroundings as inspiration to build a literary universe. Several small towns in central Maine serve as the real-life backdrops for such famously inhospitable fictional settings as Castle Rock and Derry, which feature in his most famous novels—from It to Pet Sematary—and their onscreen adaptations. So come, take a tour of Uncle Stevie’s famous New England haunts—if you dare.

1. Banngor

King moved with his family to Bangor in 1979—and, giving it the fictional name Derry, he’s used the setting for many of his tales, including It (1986) and the 1994 novel Insomnia. The two locales share many landmarks, such as the giant Paul Bunyan statue possessed by the supernatural clown Pennywise. King still owns a home (pictured) in Bangor—and in 2019 he began converting the neighboring house into a writers’ retreat.

2. Durham

The author spent much of his childhood here, fueling his obsession with small-town America. Durham is located in the same geographical area as Castle Rock, the fictional backdrop of the Hulu show of the same name, as well as the books The Dead Zone, Cujo, Needful Things, and The Body, later adapted into the movie Stand by Me—which, ironically, was filmed mostly in Oregon.

3. Thomaston

In the Stephen King universe, the Shawshank State Prison is Maine’s largest penitentiary, seen in all its brutal glory in the short story Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption. The real-life building (pictured) was demolished in 2002, but fans can visit the nearby Maine State Prison Showroom, which sells souvenirs produced by inmates—including Shawshank-themed hoodies.

4. Orrington

Before moving to Bangor, the King family lived next to this town’s pet cemetery—King was inspired to write the terrifying 1983 book Pet Sematary after the death of his daughter’s cat Smucky. “That night, after we buried [Smucky], we heard [my daughter] out in the garage…shouting, ‘God can’t have my cat, that cat is my cat!’” King told EW in 2019. “And I put all that in the book. Everything in the book, up to the point of the supernatural stuff, is true.”

5. Orono

Orono is home to the picturesque University of Maine, where King studied English in the late ’60s and served as writer in residence in 1978. (He also wrote a weekly column for the school newspaper and even met his future wife, Tabitha, in the library.) In Sematary, doctor Louis Creed (played by Jason Clarke in the 2019 film) is appointed director of the university’s campus health service, but moves his doomed family from Chicago to a house near Ludlow, a tiny town 100 miles north.

Reprinted from Entertainment Weekly

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David Sedaris Discusses New Book The Best of Me

Asking an interview subject about their pandemic isolation journey is dangerously close to passé. But for a David Sedaris interview, it’s a requirement: The essayist’s entire brand is built on nonstop international touring, his best material flowing from his travels and his frequent — and often off-color — interactions with his fans. (On his last tour, he drew portraits of readers naked from behind instead of signing their books.) Anyway, his quarantine story: He spent the first part in his apartment in New York before decamping to his North Carolina beach house — dubbed the Sea Section — and then, ultimately, to his homes in the U.K. (Sussex and London), where he’s passed his days maintaining his diary and obsessively checking his Fitbit.

Entertainment Weekly conducted this interview in early August, by late-night (for him) phone call — Sedaris has a strict no-Zoom policy. He paces back and forth in the office of his Sussex home, nearly crossing the 18-mile mark on his daily steps as the clock strikes midnight. Asked for a visual — he’s an infamous clotheshorse — his description goes beyond what could typically be seen in the waist-up frame of a screen: “It looks like I’m wearing a white skirt, but it’s a pair of shorts,” he says. “The legs are so wide, I look like one of those Greek soldiers.”

If it seems like Sedaris, 63, has a very cushy pandemic setup — this bucolic pic was shot at his London abode — he’s more than earned it. Punishing schedule aside, he’s been publishing best-selling books for more than a quarter-century (his first, Barrel Fever, debuted in 1994), and this fall he’s set to release his inaugural greatest-hits collection, The Best of Me. He wrote every day for 15 years before Fever was published (“Most of those days I thought, ‘Wow, I suck’ ”), so he doesn’t take this point in his career lightly. The Best of Me encompasses a wide swath of his past work, from early entries in The New Yorker’s Shouts & Murmurs section to fan-favorite essays like 2000’s “Me Talk Pretty One Day” (in which he recounts taking French-language classes from a merciless teacher) and 2016’s “The Perfect Fit” (about shopping for outrageous clothes in Tokyo).

But that doesn’t mean he’s going to pander to the masses: It’s better you hear it here first that “SantaLand Diaries,” about his stint as a Macy’s elf, is not included. “That might have been other people’s favorite, but it was never even in my top 100,” Sedaris says of the 1992 story that plays on NPR to this day. “It’s what most people know me from, but I’ve kind of moved on — I think the writing is so clunky, even if others don’t see it.”

The Best of Me required far less work than an original book, so the author is already looking to his next one: a second diary compilation (following 2017’s Theft byFinding), expected in late 2021. The pandemic is providing plenty of time to comb through journal entries, triggering as they may be. “In so many of [the entries] I was on tour,” he says. “So even the hotels I was complaining about, it’s like, God, I’d give anything to be back in that shitty hotel.” Much of what Sedaris records in his diary stems from the human contact we all took for granted before our age of quarantine. But he’s finding new ways to drum up material: Recent visits to the grocery store featured the sighting of a shopper without a shirt (or a mask) and a man who told him, “The funniest thing you ever said was that you gave $1,000 to Hillary Clinton.”

And while Sedaris misses the collective laughter that a packed theater provides, he doesn’t miss it enough to get on an Instagram Live or join Twitter: “I just don’t want to live in that world,” he says. “I think it makes me a happy person that I’m not on social media.” It’s a stark contrast to many of today’s authors, who find it crucial to promote their books on every digital platform. But Sedaris sees himself as part of the last generation to have the luxury of getting famous without social media, and he credits his early start on This American Life, when the radio format limited criticism of his work, for his rise: “I feel fortunate to have come up in a time when people didn’t get the opportunity to see the cracks.”

A social media absence shouldn’t be confused for an immunity to public opinion — with every release, a self-imposed pressure to perform at his peak mounts. The Best of Me offers a bit of a reprieve, since everything but the introduction has already been published. “With a normal book, if it wasn’t number one on the New York Times best-seller list, I would berate myself,” he says. “I would still like for it to do well, but I don’t feel its success reflects on me personally.”

There’s no tour this time around, obviously, but Sedaris is getting back to another beloved activity from his old life: shopping. He counts high-end boutiques among his favorite places, and shopkeepers as his personal friends. The author has ventured out to London’s Dover Street Market — he’s a regular — and to Bloomingdale’s, where a fittingly bleak interaction presented itself. “The clerk said, ‘Welcome in,’ ” Sedaris recalls with good-humored disdain. “Civilization as we know it ends, but ‘Welcome in’ survives? I realized I should have been grateful everyday I didn’t have to hear that.” His readers will just have to hope he wrote the whole thing down.

For more from Entertainment Weekly’s Fall Books Special, you can find it on newsstands beginning Sept. 18. There will also be a special edition of the issue at Barnes & Noble stores beginning Sept. 25.

Reprinted from Entertainment Weekly.

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Entertainment Weekly Black Widow Cover Story

Scarlett Johansson readies for battle the way a veteran doctor scrubs in for surgery or an astronaut gears up for her eighth space flight. Hair drawn back in a tidy braid, she barely glances down at Natasha Romanoff’s familiar black catsuit as she buckles every buckle and zips every zipper with rhythmic efficiency. Squeezed into a closet-size armory on a Manhattan Beach soundstage, Johansson’s assassin-turned-Avenger is surrounded by all the guns, knives, and glossy wigs a superspy could ever need. She moves like she’s been doing this for a decade — because she has.

But this is something new: There’s no Captain America or Hawkeye to assist her, no S.H.I.E.L.D. backup waiting out of sight. This is Black Widow’s long-awaited solo movie, set in the turmoil between the all-star superhero team’s breakup in 2016’s Captain America: Civil War and their reunion in 2018’s Avengers: Infinity War. The mission she’s prepping for is personal, as the former Russian agent is going up against opponents from her past. When a fellow Widow, Rachel Weisz’s Melina, wonders how they’ll tackle one particularly formidable foe, Natasha replies, “Just get me close to him.” It’s not an arrogant quip or a self-congratulatory boast, just a matter-of-fact threat from a spy who is very, very good at her job.

Then, just as Johansson pulls on her last glove with a satisfying snap…darkness. The studio has lost power; in the dark, someone calls out for flashlights. After a quick investigation, the production crew discovers the blackout is not the work of a diabolical supervillain but a blown transformer nearby. Natasha’s mission will have to wait a little while longer — but that’s all right. Black Widow knows how to wait.

Read more HERE.

To read more on Black Widow, pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly beginning on Tuesday, March 17.

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Here’s How To Make Kevin’s Famous Chili From The Office 

In celebration of National Chili Day and The Office’s upcoming 15th anniversary, Entertainment Weekly looks back at the time Dunder Mifflin’s bumbling accountant Kevin Malone (Brian Baumgartner) lugged in a huge pot of his famous chili to share with his co-workers — and spilled it all over the floor.

“At least once a year, I like to bring in some of my Kevin’s Famous Chili,” he says in the season 5 episode “Casual Friday” (watch a clip below). “The trick is to undercook the onions. Everybody is going to get to know each other in the pot. I’m serious about this stuff. I’m up the night before, pressing garlic and dicing whole tomatoes. I toast my own ancho chilies. It’s a recipe passed down from Malones for generations — it’s probably the thing I do best.”

When The Office shot this classic cold open, they just used Hormel chili from a can. EW took it one step further and faithfully recreated Kevin’s family dish. (Recipe developed by Adam Hickman.)

Kevin’s Famous Chili Recipe

4 dried ancho chiles (about 1 3/4 oz.)
2 Tbsp. canola oil
3 lbs. 85/15 lean ground beef
2 cups coarsely chopped yellow onion (from 1 [12-oz.] onion)
1/4 cup coarsely chopped jalapeño chile (from 1 [2-oz.] chile)
8 large garlic cloves
1 Tbsp. dried oregano
2 (12-oz.) bottles lager beer
3 (15-oz.) cans kidney beans, drained and rinsed
1 to 2 Tbsp. water
3 cups beef stock
2 1/2 cups finely chopped plum tomatoes (from 3 large tomatoes)
2 Tbsp. kosher salt
4 oz. cheddar cheese, shredded (about 1 cup)
1/2 cup sour cream
1/4 cup sliced scallions (from 2 scallions)

1. Tear ancho chiles into large pieces, discarding seeds and stems. Place ancho chiles in a Dutch oven. Cook over medium high, stirring occasionally, until very fragrant, 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer ancho chiles to a food processor; process until very finely ground, about 1 minute. Remove, and set aside.

2. Add oil to Dutch oven, and heat over medium high. Add half of the ground beef; cook, stirring occasionally to break beef into small pieces, until well browned, about 6 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer beef from Dutch oven to a plate, and set aside. Repeat with remaining beef.

3. Pulse onion in a food processor until finely chopped, about 5 pulses. Remove from food processor, and set aside. Add onion to Dutch oven, and cook over medium high, stirring occasionally, 2 minutes. (Onion will be undercooked.) Remove from heat.

4. Process jalapeño in a food processor until finely chopped, about 30 seconds. Finely grate garlic using a Microplane grater (or press with a garlic press). Add ground ancho chiles, finely chopped jalapeño, grated garlic and oregano to Dutch oven; cook over medium high, stirring occasionally, until jalapeño starts to soften, about 2 minutes. Add beer; cook 7 minutes, stirring and scraping occasionally to loosen any browned bits from bottom of Dutch oven.

5. Meanwhile, place beans and 1 tablespoon of the water in food processor, and process until smooth, about 1 minute. (If necessary, add remaining 1 tablespoon water, and process until smooth.)

6. Add pureed beans, stock, tomatoes, salt, and cooked beef to Dutch oven. Cover and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to medium low to maintain simmer, and cook 2 hours so everything gets to know each other in the pot. Remove from heat; uncover and let stand 1 hour. Cover and refrigerate 8 hours or up to overnight.

7. Reheat, and bring chili to a simmer over medium high, stirring often. Serve with cheese, sour cream, and scallions.

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Celebrate The 15th Anniversary of The Office With Entertainment Weekly’s Special Collector’s Edition

Take a break from planning the next way you’re going to mercilessly prank your co-workers and listen up! Whether you’ve been a fan of The Office since it first premiered on March 24, 2005, or you’ve more recently become acquainted with the Dunder Mifflin crew after having binged one, two, or — let’s be honest — all nine seasons on Netflix, Entertainment Weekly has good news for you.

In celebration of the beloved workplace comedy’s 15th anniversary, EW pulled together a special collector’s edition chock full of Office trivia and exclusive interviews with the cast and creators. Inside you’ll find oral histories recounting Jim and Pam’s nuptials, Michael Scott’s last day, and the show’s teary finale.

Entertainment Weekly’s Ultimate Guide to The Office also revisits some of the most hilarious and cringe-worthy episodes (“Dinner Party,” anyone?) and tests your knowledge on how well you really know Scranton’s very own beet connoisseur Dwight Schrute. Dunderheads are sure to get a kick out of a serious film review of Michael’s Threat Level Midnight, a crossword puzzle dedicated to Stanley, a field guide to Angela’s cats, and much more. There’s even a recipe for Kevin’s famous chili recipe. (Tip: Undercook the onions.)

Pick up a copy of Entertainment Weekly’s Ultimate Guide to The Office, available now wherever magazines are sold 

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Wonder Woman 1984: How A Top-Secret Love Story And Brand New Armor Promise To Make The Sequel Sing

Gal Gadot is waiting for the boosh. Eyes narrowed, bouncing lightly on her toes — float like a butterfly, sting like an Amazonian queen — she moves soundlessly through the chilled air of cavernous studio outside London, her shoulder blades blooming into a set of molten-gold wings.

When the explosion comes, it’s muffled, but the soldiers who emerge from the blast in full combat gear don’t look like they’re here to make friends. As she dispatches them one by one, it’s impossible not to imagine how many of them are experiencing the highlight of their working lives in this very moment: men who will spend the next 40 years telling every first date and airplane seatmate about that one time they were annihilated by the warrior princess of Themyscira.

“Ahhh, so uncomfortable!” Gadot says with a good-naturedly grimace after the scene finally wraps, shrugging off her shiny albatross and slipping into the plush gray robe and Ugg boots that wait for her just off stage. It’s the closest the 34-year-old onetime Miss Israel will come to uttering an uncheerful word, even after long hours spent in a wingspan that defies the natural laws of both orthopedics and most actual birds.

Endurance, though, is built into the brand: A months-long shoot has already hopscotched from the sunbaked Spanish cliffs of Tenerife to suburban Virginia and now back to the bone-chilling damp of England in early winter. On the set of 2017’s Wonder Woman, Gadot remembers, she and costar Chris Pine would sing Foreigner’s “Cold as Ice” to each other between takes to stay warm; in the follow-up, due June 5, the action moves from the grim grayscale battlefields of WWI to the neon era that birthed many a hair band — and the movie’s titular star, too. 

“I was born in ’85, but it’s funny, I really do remember,” Gadot says in her lightly accented English, settling into a canvas-back chair steps from where she just brought a battalion to its knees. “Probably more so because of my parents, but it was a such a standout decade as much as it goes with fashion, music, politics. And the look of everything! The colors.”

If you had to pick just one from the palette, you might want to start with green: the color of money, of course, but envy, too. “In 1984, America was at the peak of its power and its pride,” says associate producer Anna Obropta. “Apple computers and parachute pants, wealth, commercialism, glamour, even violence — everything was larger than life. It was a decade of greed and desire, a time of ‘Me, me, more more more.’”

Read more of the Entertainment Weekly cover story HERE and pick up the issue on Friday, February 14.

     

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Daniel Craig Faces Off With Supervillain Rami Malek In No Time To Die, His Final James Bond Film

In his last mission as James Bond 007, Daniel Craig squares off against Rami Malek. 

For Entertainment Weekly’s February cover, the ‘No Time to Die’ star reflects on the iconic role and why he signed on for his final Bond film.

Read more HERE.

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Entertainment Weekly Reveals 3 Covers For Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker Issue

Read about The Rise of Skywalker and other untold stories from the Star Wars universe, in the new issue of Entertainment Weekly at Barnes & Noble on Friday. Pick your choice of 3 covers featuring stars of the prequels, original trilogy, or current saga. 

The issue will be on newsstands starting Nov. 28. Read HERE.

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