Tag Archives: Magazine

TIME Announces The 2019 Person of The Year

Time magazine has chosen Greta Thunberg, a Swedish climate crisis activist, as person of the year.

Thunberg, 16, is the youngest individual to be recognized. She gained international attention for excoriating world leaders for their inaction in the climate crisis in a viral speech she made at the UN Climate Action Summit in September. 

Time also announced winners of four new categories. Athlete of the year is the US women’s soccer team, entertainer of the year is Lizzo and business person of the year is Disney CEO Bob Iger. After recognizing “The Guardians” last year, Time created a new category to recognize a different group of “Guardians” — those who took to the stand and risked their careers in the defense of the rule of law. The public servants in this category include the whistleblower, Marie Yovanovitch, Ambassador William Taylor, Fiona Hill, Lieut. Colonel Alexander Vindman and Mark Sandy.

Read more HERE.

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The TIME 100 Next List

With the current issue of TIME, the magazine has launched the TIME 100 Next, a new list—part of an ongoing expansion of our flagship TIME 100 franchise—that spotlights 100 rising stars who are shaping the future of business, entertainment, sports, politics, science, health and more. Although this focus lends itself to a younger group, we intentionally had no age cap—a recognition that ascents can begin at any age. The youngest person on this list, for example, is 14-year-old figure-skating phenom Alysa Liu, who recently became the first U.S. woman to land a quadruple Lutz in competition. The oldest is Ayman Odeh, a politician who, at 44, has emerged as a potential kingmaker in Israeli politics

Check out the list HERE.

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Stephen King On Doctor Sleep, Donald Trump And Why He Often Writes About Children

The best-selling novelist, Stephen King speaks to TIME about the upcoming adaptation of his story Doctor Sleep, his thoughts on Donald Trump and why he often writes about children.

Read the interview HERE.

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Stephen King On His New Horror Novel, The ‘Nightmare’ of Trump, And Stranger Things

Donald Trump was still months away from being elected president when Stephen King began writing his new novel. But The Institute — out September 10th and centered on a 12-year-old boy stolen from his parents in the night and locked up in a mysterious facility — is likely to remind readers of certain immigration policies. “I can’t help but see similarity between what’s going on in The Institute and those pictures of kids in cages,” says King. “Sometimes fiction outpaces fact.”

This isn’t the first time a King book predicted the political future: His 1979 book The Dead Zone was about a Trump-like aspiring president threatening global apocalypse if he took office. “Fiction has foreseen Trump before,” says King, “always as a nightmare. Now, the nightmare is here. But I don’t want to force my worldview on people. I’m not George Orwell, and this book isn’t 1984. It wasn’t meant to be an allegory.”

King is calling in from his house in Maine, just a couple of weeks after traveling to Foxborough, Massachusetts, to see his first-ever Rolling Stones concert. (“Keith looked a little tentative and just putting in the time at first, but then he caught fire.”) He’s still reveling in the surge of interest in his work that followed 2017’s It, now the highest-grossing horror movie ever. “I think a lot of kids watched the [1990] It miniseries with Tim Curry, and it scared the living shit right out of them,” King says. “They couldn’t wait to go back and see it again.”

Like IT, The Institute is about a group of children who band together to battle an unspeakably evil force. The twist this time is that they all have telekinetic or psychic powers and the adults who run the facility force them to undergo medical experiments. “I wanted to write a book like Tom Brown’s School Days,” King says, referencing the 1857 Thomas Hughes children’s classic about a British boarding school. “But in hell.”

A book about ­clairvoyant kids battling a shadow organization will surely draw comparisons to Stranger Things. Which was, of course, heavily inspired by Stephen King books. “I like [Stranger Things] a lot, but it does owe something to It,” the ­author says. “That’s another book about kids who are weak and helpless by themselves — but together can make something that is very strong.” 

Long before Stranger Things and even It, children with supernatural powers were at the center of King books like Carrie, The Shining, and Firestarter. “Like a pitcher that has a great fastball or slider, you go back to what worked for you before,” says King. “I do think that kids are sort of magic. When I was a young man, I could draw [inspiration] from my own kids. Now that I’m so much older, I am drawing from my grandchildren and what I see them doing and how I see them interacting.”

The Institute could be the next King project to be ­adapted by Hollywood, joining The Stand (CBS All Access), The Outsider (HBO), and Lisey’s Story (Apple TV+) — plus the seven movies he has in development. King has script ­approval on all of them. “The scripts have to work,” he says. “They can’t have 19 pages of flashbacks to when the characters were kids. I want the pedal to the metal as much of the time as possible.”

The film adaptation of King’s 2013 The Shining sequel, Dr. Sleep, comes out November 8th and features Ewan McGregor playing an adult Danny Torrance. Though King has always hated Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 adaptation of his book for changing so much of the story, he allowed the Dr. Sleep filmmakers to use elements of Kubrick’s version. “My problem with Kubrick’s film was that it’s so cold,” King says. “The reason I didn’t have any problem with this script is they took some of Kubrick’s material and warmed it up.”

King’s next book, If It Bleeds, is due out sometime in 2020. It’s a continuation of his ongoing Holly Gibney detective series. “I have to do a polish on that,” he says. “But it’s basically done.” He’s already jamming away on the one after that (though he’s not ready to divulge any details) and the sudden surge of interest in his work has been a great motivator to keep going. “I’m 71 years old,” he says, “and a lot of people my age are forgotten and I’ve had this late season burst of success. It’s very gratifying.”

Naturally, retirement remains the last thing on his mind. “That’s God’s decision, not mine,” he says. But I’ll know when it’s time. I’ll either collapse at my desk or the ideas will run out — the thing you don’t want to do is embarrass yourself. As long as I feel like I’m still doing good work, I can’t see myself stopping.”

Reprinted from Rolling Stone

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TIME’s 2019 World’s Greatest Places

How does one measure the greatness of a place—in miles covered, dollars spent, or visitors captivated? Such metrics can play a part, but also important is something that many travelers aspire to experience: the sense that one has stumbled upon the extraordinary.

To compile TIME’s second annual list of the World’s Greatest Places, the magazine solicited nominations across a variety of categories—including museums, parks, restaurants, and hotels—from our editors and correspondents around the world as well as industry experts. Then they evaluated each one based on key factors, including quality, originality, sustainability, innovation and influence.

The result: 100 new and newly noteworthy destinations to experience right now, from America’s hottest hometown pizzeria to a Tokyo museum bringing digital art to life.

California made the list with Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland, Hearst Castle in San Simeon, AutoCamp in Yosemite, Arts District Firehouse Hotel in Los Angeles, and Nyum Bai restaurant in Oakland.

To see the full list, click HERE.

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Entertainment Weekly Comic-Con Bonus Issue Cover Story Features IT Chapter Two

Get an exclusive look at IT: Chapter Two in Entertainment Weekly’s special Comic-Con International bonus issue, distributed throughout the weekend in San Diego.

IT: Chapter Two (out September 6), the sequel to Andy Muschietti’s 2017 film IT was adapted from Stephen King’s classic novel. The movie starred a group of misfit kids — who dubbed themselves the Losers’ Club — battling a child-slaying supernatural entity who reveals himself to his prey as a clown called Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård). Despite initial doubts from horror fans that Skarsgård could match Tim Curry’s iconic performance as the fanged entertainer in the much-loved 1990 It miniseries, the Swedish actor and the Losers’ Club turned out to be winners, with the $35 million-budget film praised by critics and going on to gross $700 million at the global box office.

It: Chapter Two is set 27 years after the events of its predecessor, as Pennywise returns to the streets — and sewer drains — of the fictional New England town of Derry to slay more children…unless the Losers’ Club can stop him. The young cast of the first IT was, unsurprisingly, in large part made up of unknowns, with Stranger Things star Finn Wolfhard, who played the wiseacre Richie, the best known of the bunch. Chapter Two, in contrast, boasts several high-profile actors, including Jessica Chastain, who plays Beverly, the lone woman in the Losers’ Club; Bill Hader as Richie; Sinister franchise actor James Ransone as the grown-up version of the supposedly sickly Eddie; and James Mc­Avoy as Bill, who lost his younger brother, Georgie, to Pennywise in the first film.

The Muschiettis cast Jay Ryan (Top of the Lake) as Ben, Andy Bean (Swamp Thing) as Stanley, and Isaiah Mustafa (Shadowhunters, the Old Spice commercials) as Mike, the one member of the Losers’ Club to remain in Derry, who now works as a librarian. 

Read more HERE.

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Rolling Stone Cover Story: The Softer Side of Howard Stern

After years of psy­cho­therapy, the King of All Media looks back, repents, and rescues a few kittens…

Howard stern hasn’t released a book in 24 years. Back in those days, he was a guy who didn’t think twice about calling Rosie O’Donnell a “fat pig”; using a giant, rotting fish as a mallet to spank a naked woman on the air; or viciously mocking a member of his “Wack Pack” with Down syndrome he’d dubbed “Gary the Retard.” On the cover of the book Miss America, he dressed as a drag queen, and inside he offered detailed accounts of his private cybersex sessions with fans.

The Howard Stern of 2019 — who spends his free time fostering rescue cats or painting watercolors — can only shudder when that book and its 1993 predecessor, Private Parts, comes up. “If I read them, I’d want to jump out a window,” he says. “I haven’t picked them up in years. They are snapshots of who I was back then, and I want to take that guy and shake him. I was a selfish prick. I can just see that quote in Rolling Stone, ‘I was a selfish prick.’ But it’s true.”

It’s before 8 a.m. on a Thursday in mid-April, and Stern is usually at his Hamptons home or Palm Beach estate by now, since he broadcasts Mondays through Wednesdays only. But he’s come into his SiriusXM studio in New York for a rare extended interview timed to the release of his new book, Howard Stern Comes Again, a compendium of his best interviews with the likes of Lady Gaga, Stephen Colbert, Gwyneth Paltrow and other A-listers.

Stern is now friends with ex-antagonists like O’Donnell. Gary is almost never seen; when he is, Stern lovingly calls him “Gary the Conquerer.” “Retard” has vanished from Stern’s vocabulary, along with bits that demean women or minorities. He vacations with friends like Jimmy Kimmel and Jennifer Aniston, and goes to parties with Jerry Seinfeld, Steve Martin and others he used to torment.

To Stern die-hards, this is blasphemy — the equivalent of Johnny Rotten singing Pat Boone songs. Superfans gather each day on the Howard Stern subreddit to blast their former hero, calling him “Hollywood Howie” or “PC Howie” and arguing over when they stopped listening. (Oddly enough, they all seem tuned in to current show developments.) But as Stern settles onto the studio couch usually reserved for show guests, he says he doesn’t care about the Reddit crew. As he reveals in his new book, he recently had two cancer scares. First, he almost underwent chemotherapy when his white-blood-cell count was off the charts, but discovered at the last moment that he was suffering from mercury poisoning from eating too much fish. Then, in a hypochondriac’s nightmare scenario, he got a full-body scan and doctors saw a spot on his kidney. They said there was a 95 percent chance it was cancer, and he had major surgery, only to wake up and learn it was a cyst that had burst.

In the book, he also says that after many years of psychotherapy he has come to terms with his narcissism. He says he no longer has any desire to humiliate or insult guests to score ratings. In an era when former heavyweights like Charlie Rose and Matt Lauer have been pushed out of the industry due to their treatment of women, it’s no small irony that Stern’s couch is now where some of the biggest names in the industry go for in-depth interviews. It’s the sort of third-act surprise that few people would have ever predicted for the guy formerly known as Fartman.

Read the full Rolling Stone interview HERE.

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Entertainment Weekly’s Captain Marvel Cover Story

She’s an all-powerful Air Force pilot from outer space. He’s a government desk jockey with zero extraterrestrial experience. This intergalactic odd couple forms the backbone of Captain Marvel (out March 8), the 1990s-set film that follows Carol Danvers (Brie Larson), Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson), and an orange cat named Goose as they try to stop invading aliens from treating Planet Earth as their next battlefield.

It’s a playful, trash-talking relationship based in reality. Since starring together in 2017’s Kong: Skull Island and Larson’s directorial debut, Unicorn Store (premiering April 5 on Netflix), Larson and Jackson have become the kind of buddies who lean on each other’s shoulders in interviews and finish each other’s sentences. “Marvel was like, ‘Is there anybody that you’d wanna do [the movie] with?’” Larson recalls. “And I was like, ‘Please. I need to be with my pal. Don’t let me do it alone!’”

Ahead of Captain Marvel’s release, Larson and Jackson sat down with Entertainment Weekly to talk aliens, Jedi masters, and the magnitude of Marvel fame. (They also opened up about their scene-stealing costar: Goose the cat.)

And as a special bonus, EW is honoring Captain Marvel’s retro setting by taking this week’s cover back to 1995, complete with old fonts and logos. Make sure to pick up a copy on stands Friday to experience the full issue in all its throwback glory.

Read more HERE.

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Entertainment Weekly’s Captain Marvel Collector’s Edition

Marvel fans got their first introduction to Brie Larson’s high-flying Captain Marvel at the end of Avengers: Infinity War, and the hot shot-pilot-turned-galactic-warrior will soon be storming the big screen with a solo film of her own. 

To celebrate the character’s official induction into the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Entertainment Weekly has assembled a massive special edition breaking down all things Captain Marvel.

The issue takes a deep dive into Carol Danvers’ world, from her complicated comics backstory to her path to the screen (and her history-making turn as the MCU’s first solo female hero). Not only did we get some inside scoop from interviews with the film’s stars — including Larson, Samuel L. Jackson, Jude Law, Lashana Lynch, Ben Mendelsohn, Clark Gregg, Gemma Chan, and more — but we also have exclusive stills, behind-the-scenes photos, and production art. It’s the perfect guide to the Marvel’s newest hero, whether you’ve been a longtime member of the Carol Corps or are just making your first foray into the MCU.

Pick up a copy of Entertainment Weekly’s guide to Captain Marvel on newsstands now, or buy it online.

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Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse Photo Honors Stan Lee’s Legacy

Ask any Spider-Man fan, big or small, to repeat the most enduring message of the web-slinging Peter Parker, and you’ll likely get a faithful recitation of his Uncle Ben’s advice: “With great power comes great responsibility.” This concept goes hand-in-hand with something the heroic Peter says, with a heavy dose of irony, early in Sony Pictures Animation’s new Into the Spider-Verse: “There’s only one Spider-Man, and you’re looking at him.”

Of course, as this new official photo—which pairs the film’s voice talent with their various on-screen avatars—demonstrates, he’s wrong. Into the Spider-Verse is packed with a number of Spider-People who all share the heroic burden Uncle Ben was so concerned with. In that way, this latest on-screen iteration might be the most faithful adaptation of Stan Lee’s vision for the character, whom he co-created over half a century ago.

Into the Spider-Verse—which exists alongside Tom Holland’s current live-action run as Peter Parker—introduces Shameik Moore as Miles Morales, a Brooklyn-dwelling, bi-racial version of your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man. But thanks to a rip in the fabric of reality, he’s not alone in facing down a packed roster of Spider villains, including Liev Schreiber’s Kingpin. Morales is also joined by Jake Johnson’s battered Peter Parker, Hailee Steinfeld’s wry Spider-Gwen, John Mulaney’s Looney Tunes-esque Spider-Ham, Nicolas Cage’s dour Spider-Man Noir, and Kimiko Glenn’s chipper Peni Parker, with her robotic sidekick “Sp//dr.”

At an early point on this hero’s journey, Morales listens in awe as Peter Parker’s frequent on-screen love interest, Mary Jane Watson (Zoë Kravitz), offers a different take on Uncle Ben’s advice, one that underlines the shared responsibility of the multi-verse: “We are all Spider-Man, and we are all counting on you.” Later, the movie puts it even more succinctly: “Anyone can wear the mask.”

Read more HERE.

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