Tag Archives: Magazine

The 2021 TIME100 Next List

TIME Magazine has assembled their second annual TIME100 Next list—an expansion of their flagship TIME100 franchise that highlights 100 emerging leaders who are shaping the future.

Amid a global pandemic, deepening inequality, systemic injustice and existential questions about truth, democracy and the planet itself, the individuals on this year’s list provide “clear-eyed hope,” as actor, composer and director Lin-Manuel Miranda puts it in his tribute to poet and TIME100 Next honoree Amanda Gorman. They are doctors and scientists fighting COVID-19, advocates pushing for equality and justice, journalists standing up for truth, and artists sharing their visions of present and future.

As with Miranda and Gorman, many of the TIME100 Next profiles are written by TIME100 alumni—a testament to the ways that influence flows across generations. One example: Dr. Anthony Fauci, who recently turned 80, calls his fellow immunologist and National Institutes of Health colleague Kizzmekia Corbett, 35, “a rising star” whose work—which was key to the development of the Moderna vaccine for COVID-19—“will have a substantial impact on ending the worst respiratory-disease pandemic in more than 100 years.”

Equally powerful is the influence flowing between these emerging leaders themselves. Greta Thunberg, 18, TIME’s 2019 Person of the Year, writes about 24-year-old Uganda-based Vanessa Nakate, whose Rise Up movement focuses on the disproportionate impact of climate change on the African continent and the Global South. “In this moment of intersecting crises—from COVID-19 to racial injustice, from ecological problems to economic inequality—Vanessa continues to teach a most critical lesson,” Thunberg writes. “She reminds us that while we may all be in the same storm, we are not all in the same boat.”

Although recognizing the leaders of tomorrow lends itself to a younger group, TIME intentionally had no age cap, an acknowledgment that ascents can begin at any age. The youngest person on this list, for example, is 16-year-old entertainer Charli D’Amelio, who counts more than 100 million followers on TikTok. Among the eldest is 51-year-old Raphael Warnock, a Democratic Senator from Georgia, whose recent election represents “the dawn of a new South,” writes Rev. Bernice A. King, the CEO of the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change.

See the full list HERE.

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Who Really Created The Marvel Universe?

Stan Lee presided over a world of superheroes, but his collaborators and readers sustained his vision—and his characters outlasted it.

To give a full account of Stan Lee, as Abraham Riesman sets out to do in a new biography, “True Believer” (Crown), is to contend not just with his presence in popular culture (the smiling oldster in sunglasses, with a cameo in each Marvel film) but with the fluid nature of artistic collaboration, and so with endless debates over which parts of the comics are his.

Read the full article from The New Yorker HERE.

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Meet TIME’s First-Ever Kid of The Year

For the past 92 years, TIME has named a Person of the Year. In 2019, then-16-year-old Greta Thunberg became the youngest ever Person of the Year, and the first individual under age 25 to receive the title. Her movement to stop climate change, among other world-shifting youth movements of recent years, make clear that young people carry tremendous influence today, and that they are using that influence to shape a world that matches their vision.

This year, in partnership with Nickelodeon, TIME is recognizing in the U.S. its first ever Kid of the Year, a barometer for the rising leaders of America’s youngest generation. To choose the most influential kids of 2020, we looked across social media and school districts, at actions big and small. “Small steps can lead to big change,” says TIME for Kids editor Andrea Delbanco. “These are everyday kids making change in their communities in a fun and accessible—but very impactful—way.”

Panelists including representatives from the Special Olympics and Laureus Sport for Good Foundation USA formed an advisory committee to help judge the more than 5,000 U.S.-based nominees on the positive impact they’ve had this year and signs that they’ll continue to lead in the future. A committee of kids, including Nickelodeon stars Young Dylan and Chinguun Sergelen, Disney star Sky Katz, Little Chef Ivy, and Time For Kids kid reporters Tiana Sirmans and Raunak Singh, then worked with comedian Trevor Noah to narrow down the finalists and select the ultimate Kid of the Year.

The five finalists have grown food for those in crisis, designed better toys for kids with disabilities, and started new conversations about racial justice. They include Tyler Gordon, 14, from San Jose, Calif.; Jordan Reeves, 14, from Columbia, Mo.; Bellen Woodard, 10, from Leesburg, Va.; and Ian McKenna, 16, from Austin.

Exceptional leadership is what made the ultimate Kid of the Year, 15-year-old scientist and inventor Gitanjali Rao, stand out. Rao not only researches scientific tools such as artificial intelligence and carbon nanotube sensor technology and applies them to problems she sees in everyday life, like cyberbullying and water contamination. She also shows other kids how to tap into their curiosity, aspiring to create a generation of innovators.

Each of this year’s five finalists will be designated a TIME for Kids Kid Reporter, given opportunities to contribute to TIME, and will receive a cash prize from ViacomCBS, Nickelodeon’s owner.

“I really hope the work that all of these kids are doing identifies innovation as a necessity and not something that’s a choice anymore,” Rao tells Angelina Jolie in an interview for TIME. “I hope I can be a small part of that.”

Read more HERE.

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TIME Magazine 100 Best Inventions of 2020

Every year, TIME highlights inventions that are making the world better, smarter and even a bit more fun. 

To assemble our 2020 list, TIME solicited nominations both from their editors and correspondents around the world, and through an online application process. They then evaluated each contender on key factors, including originality, creativity, effectiveness, ambition and impact.

The result: 100 groundbreaking inventions—including a smarter beehive, a greener tube of toothpaste, and technology that could catalyze a COVID-19 vaccine—that are changing the way we live, work, play and think about what’s possible.

See the full list HERE.

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Marvel Studios’ WandaVision: Entertainment Weekly Welcomes You To The Wanda Years

 

As Marvel Studios gets ready to launch the first of their original television series, exclusively for Disney+, Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany reprise their roles as Wanda Maximoff and Vision, respectively, on the cover of Entertainment Weekly in support of their series WandaVision.

The new EW issue, arriving this week, gives us an in-depth behind-the-scenes look at the Marvel Studios’ original series, ahead of its Disney+ debut, and its wonderfully weird send-up of sitcoms past.

WandaVision, starring Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany, is a blend of classic television and the Marvel Cinematic Universe in which Wanda Maximoff and Vision—two super-powered beings living idealized suburban lives—begin to suspect that everything is not as it seems.

Read the cover story HERE.

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New Stephen King Short Story ‘On Slide Inn Road’ Featured In The Oct/Nov Issue of Esquire Magazine

The Oct/Nov issue of Esquire Magazine features a new short story by Stephen King titled, “On Slide Inn Road”.

It was supposed to be a family road trip to visit an aging relative. Then the car got stuck in a muddy rut and, well – these things never turn out well, do they? 

The legendary architect of your worst nightmares delivers another shocking short story you won’t soon forget.

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Stephen King’s TV Reign: The Author Discusses Mr. Mercedes, The Stand, And The Outsider

With America experiencing what’s objectively its most terrifying year of the 21st century, it’s perhaps only appropriate that the master of horror is having one of his best.

Stephen King may be well into his fourth decade as a blockbuster storyteller, yet TV adaptations of his work have never been more popular. There’s HBO’s stealth breakout The Outsider, which launched in January; CBS All Access’ take on King’s suddenly timely pandemic classic The Stand which premieres in December, and Audience Network’s adaptation of King’s Bill Hodges crime novel trilogy Mr. Mercedes, which moves to its new home on Peacock on Thursday, Oct. 15. Not to mention, King released another best-selling book this year (a quartet of novellas under the title If It Bleeds) and has two more planned for 2021.

Entertainment Weekly spoke with King about all his TV projects and, of course, dipped a bit into politics as well. We start with Mr. Mercedes, a series that received strong praise from critics (with a 93 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes) yet reached relatively few viewers on the now-defunct Audience Network. King hopes the drama will have a better shot at finding mainstream success when its first two seasons come to Peacock this week.

“I’m so happy that Peacock is doing this because I felt like with Mr. Mercedes at AT&T we had brought a stadium show to a folk club,” King says. “Now people are going to get a chance to see it.”

Read the interview HERE.

The highlight of the interview was that King will have a second book coming out in 2020…

EW: You have a Hard Case Crime book, titled Later, coming in 2021. But I look at your website pretty regularly and it’s unusual for you not to have at least two upcoming books on your site. And so I’m wondering if there is another new title you’re working on that you can tease?

King: There will be two next year. I don’t want people to get used to that or think that that’s the norm. It’s not. But it’s just the way things happened. So there is another, but I don’t want to say anything about it yet.

No word yet on the book title or subject matter but THE FIRE WIRE will be sure to post about it as soon as the information becomes available!

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TIME Reveals Its 2020 List of The 100 Most Influential People In The World

TIME has revealed the 2020 TIME100, its annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world. The issue has 8 worldwide covers, each highlighting a member of the TIME100: immunologist Dr. Anthony Fauci , performer The Weeknd, Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai , COVID-19 frontline nurse Amy O’Sullivan , actor Gabrielle Union and athlete Dwyane Wade , performer Megan Thee Stallion , President of Taiwan Tsai Ing -wen , and Black Lives Matter founders Patrisse Cullors , Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi.

The TIME100 often includes surprising pairings of the list members and the guest contributors TIME selects to write about them. The seventeenth annual list includes: Denzel Washington on Michael B. Jordan , Derek Jeter on Patrick Mahomes , Common on Angela Davis , Ted Cruz on Tsai Ing -wen, Oprah Winfrey on Tyler Perry , Taylor Swift on Phoebe Waller-Bridge , Elizabeth Warren on Ady Barkan , Stevie Wonder on Yo-Yo Ma , Maya Moore on Naomi Osaka , Leonardo DiCaprio on Nemonte Nenquimo, Cyndi Lauper on Billy Porter , Deepika Padukone on Ayushmann Khurrana , Lena Waithe on Michaela Coel , Ayanna Pressley on Kamala Harris , Tilda Swinton on Bong Joon Ho , Kim Kardashian West on JoJo Siwa , Melinda Gates on MacKenzie Scott , Ronan Farrow on Julie K. Brown , Timothy Geithner on Jerome Powell , Jennifer Garner on Greg Berlanti and many more.

In addition to these eight covers, the issue will also feature a new cover and a special tribute commemorating Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg , who was featured on the TIME100 list in 2015.

You can see the complete 2020 TIME100 list HERE.

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The 25 Greatest Movie Bands of All Time

On October 5th, 1991, the Dublin-based soul band known as the Commitments hit their peak position on the Billboard 200 when they cracked the top 10 to secure the number eight spot on the music chart, wedged between Ozzy Osbourne and Bonnie Raitt. The biggest difference between those two legendary artists and the Irish newcomers? The Commitments were a work of pure fiction — at least, they were originally.

Originally created by writer Roddy Doyle for his 1987 novel of the same name, director Alan Parker brought The Commitments to life on August 14th, 1991 — with a cast of (mostly) musicians who had the acting chops to carry a movie. But those R&B road dogs are hardly alone: From Pitch Perfect‘s a capella champions to the punk Irish preteens of Sing Street, the movies are full of amazingly talented musical artists and groups who we only wish existed in real life.

Rolling Stone counted down the 25 most amazing “movie bands” — those fake metalheads, glam divas, bluegrass crooners and underage rock superstars that have graced the screen, and a few cases, the actual stage. 

Some of them ended up touring (big up Jake and Elwood Blues!); others played their final note the minute they heard “That’s a wrap.” But all of them go to 11. 

Check out the list HERE.

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Even Stephen King Can’t Escape A Quarantine That Feels Like Living In A Stephen King Book

Like everyone, Stephen King is trapped. The author is in Florida, with his wife, Tabby, and his corgi, Molly, trying to stay sane while sheltering in place. Meanwhile, his life’s work seems to be coming to life around him.

People keep comparing the eeriness of the COVID-19 pandemic to the far deadlier one that swept the world in his novel The Stand. They draw parallels between Donald Trump and Greg Stillson, the egomaniacal, world-threatening politician from The Dead Zone. Even the recent rush on grocery stores has vague echoes of The Mist, where shoppers turned against each other while surrounded by unseen threats.

King doesn’t feel good about seeing the worst things he can imagine coming true. He’d rather remain in the realm of the impossible. “It’s like, okay, the worst thing that could happen, in terms of my career, is that somehow, in our society, we’ve cross-pollinated our Greg Stillson with The Stand,” the author told Vanity Fair.

Even he can’t help drawing comparisons. “I’m working on a book, so in the mornings I forget everything and I just do that. I wanted time to work on a book, I got plenty of time,” he said. “I feel like Jack Torrance, for God’s sakes.”

Unlike the father in The Shining, King hasn’t gone mad yet, but he knows that boredom can push anyone to the edge. That’s one reason he and Scribner decided to release his new book, the novella collection If It Bleeds, this month, a few weeks ahead of its planned May debut. But fair warning—King devises an entire new way of destroying the world in one of the stories. (Maybe we can look forward to that too.)

Read more HERE from Vanity Fair.

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