Tag Archives: Packaging

TustoCorp Products

Last weekend, TrustoCorp, randomly placed one hundred subversively branded products onto the shelves and in the aisles of bodegas, delis, and Kmarts throughout New York City.

Slyly slipped in with existing stock, these modified consumer products are designed to confuse, entertain and make consumers think.

Tagged , ,

Clever Shopping Bag Designs

HERE are some clever shopping bags that were used in advertising campaigns by various companies from around the world.

bag

bag 2

The handles of this shopping bag are made of transparent fishing line, which makes it appear as though it is being held without handles.

Tagged , ,

SunChips Plans 100% Compostable Chip Bag

In 2010, SunChips says it will introduce the first fully compostable chip bag, designed to fully decompose in about 14 weeks when placed in a hot, active compost heap – as illustrated in this promo video. Today, SunChips says that 33% of every 10 1/2 oz. size bag is made with renewable, plant-based materials. (Thanks for the tip “Scoop Thompson”)

Tagged , ,

More Cabinet-Friendly Cereal Boxes

Kellogg’s is testing out the idea of making cereal boxes shorter and wider to save room in your cupboard and fit more on store shelves.  I like the idea because my wife cannot reach the top shelf where the cereal currently resides and now she can have her Raisin Bran Crunch whenever she wants.

 

Tagged , ,

Amazon Introduces Frustration-Free Packaging

The Frustration-Free Package (on the left) is recyclable and comes without excess packaging materials such as hard plastic clamshell casings, plastic bindings, and wire ties. It’s designed to be opened without the use of a box cutter or knife and will protect your product just as well as traditional packaging (on the right). Products with Frustration-Free Packaging can frequently be shipped in their own boxes, without an additional shipping box.

ffp-comparison-2__v261895878_

Tagged ,

Milk Jug Gets A Makeover

A simple change to the design of the gallon milk jug, adopted by Wal-Mart and Costco, seems made for the times. The jugs are cheaper to ship and better for the environment, the milk is fresher when it arrives in stores, and it costs less.

What’s not to like? Plenty, as it turns out.

The jugs have no real spout, and their unorthodox shape makes consumers feel like novices at the simple task of pouring a glass of milk. Read the whole story here.

Tagged
%d bloggers like this: